Self Publishing vs. Traditional Publishing: Why Editing Counts

For many writers, the option to self-publish is highly attractive. Traditional publishing houses are very selective and the process of sending out query letters and waiting for a response can seem overwhelming. While the self-publishing industry has gained a lot of popularity over the last few years, writers should be wary about which company they choose to work with. A common trend with self-publishers has been emerging, one that forgoes quality for quantity and is seemingly focused only on the monetary gains of the publishing industry, not the literary value of its products.

The biggest problem with self-publishing is that most self-publishing companies do not have proper quality management controls in place. Editing has become an optional task, not a given part of the process, and as a result many manuscripts are sent to print laden with grammatical errors, plot inconsistencies and typos. This has given self-publishing a bad rap, as many see it as a sub par version of traditional print publications. While this attitude should not be accurate, the failure of both writers and self-publishers to ensure the quality of their product has resulted in a less than perfect reputation for the industry.

Regardless, self-publishing can be a useful tool for many authors as long as they have their work appropriately edited and ensure that their manuscripts are polished and complete before sending them to print. Many people will refuse to read or review a book that is self-published due to this unfortunate reputation that the industry has gained. But if authors take the time to ensure the quality of the work this reputation can be turned around and self-published authors who produce great books can be recognized.

Grammar Chic, Inc. encourages all writers to have their work professionally edited. Remember your book is part of your legacy; make it shine!

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