What Your Job Search Needs is an Elevator Pitch

iStock_000020173836XSmallIf you’re in the market for a new job, you need to have a strong, hooky elevator pitch. You need it for a couple of reasons. One, you may actually find yourself in the proverbial elevator with someone—or, you know, having a drink with someone after a conference or seminar—and have an opportunity to do a quick sell for yourself. Of course, you want to be prepared!

You also need an elevator pitch for the job interview itself. Odds are, the interviewer will ask you some version of this tried-and-true job interview question: Why are you the best fit for this position? Or maybe you’ll just get a simple, So tell me about yourself. In either case, the correct response is to offer a succinct summary of your value as an employee. In short: An elevator pitch!

Crafting the Perfect Elevator Pitch

But what does a good elevator pitch entail? Here are a few tips for honing yours:

Remember what an elevator pitch is, and what it isn’t. A good elevator pitch is a 15-to-30-second synopsis of who you are as an employee. It is not a full walk through your resume. As such, you should be focused on high points and the general overview, not on hitting every single job you’ve ever had or every single skill in your toolbox.

Think in terms of value. You don’t want your elevator pitch to be a laundry list of skills. Rather, you want it to be a quick appraisal of the value you can offer an employer. Maybe you work as a Human Resources professional. Don’t list all of your skills in payroll, compliance, or whatever else; instead, say something like, “I can make your team members more motivated, engaged, and productive, and I can do it with a very small budget.”

Start with a full resume. One way to get your elevator pitch perfected is to start with a full page that includes all the things you want to say to a potential employer. Then, cut it down to half a page; then, to a quarter page; and finally, to just a few precious lines.

Rehearse your elevator pitch. The pitch isn’t just about the words, but how they are delivered. You should be able to give your pitch with total confidence. It should be as easy to you as giving your own name.

You need an elevator pitch, just as surely as you need a good resume. We can help with both. Reach out to Grammar Chic at www.grammarchic.net or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Job Search, Resume Writing, Resumes

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