Tag Archives: Beginner’s Guide to Business Blogging

5 Ways to Get New Blog Topics

blogging_tips

Blogger’s block. It’s very real, especially for small business owners who have to think up new things to say about their business or industry every week—or even every day!

No matter how regularly you blog, you’re going to get stuck for ideas from time to time. You know that your blogs need to be engaging and varied; they can’t simply be self-promotional or extoll the virtues of your company, because frankly, nobody wants to read that kind of thing.

Even when you work in an industry that’s vast and encompasses a lot—home improvement or finance or marketing—you will have days when you draw a blank. You will have days when you fumble for a new blog idea but can’t arrive at one.

Here are a few fallbacks for you, when those days come:

  1. Make sure you have some Google News alerts set up for a few industry keywords. When something new or noteworthy happens in your industry, that’s very possibly blog fodder. Maybe you want to comment on a new trend. Maybe you want to rebut a new opinion piece. Keeping in the loop about your industry is always good for those who blog.
  2. Speaking of Google, don’t forget to use it for keyword research. Type a keyword related to your industry into the search bar and see what the Suggested Search terms are; some of them might point you down new avenues for blogging. You can even sign into Google AdWords and use the Keyword Research tools to come up with new topics for blogging.
  3. Go to your blog comments section and your Facebook page. See what other people are saying. Pay attention to the things your readers care about. Not only will this provide you with some content angles, but you know they’re content angles your readers care about!
  4. Head to some of your competitors’ blogs! See what they blog about. Avoid just copying them, though; try to use their ideas to springboard to something new. Take their topics in new angles or come at them from different directions.
  5. Finally, don’t forget to recycle old content! You can find a popular older blog post and repurpose it, perhaps rewriting it as an FAQ or as a list, or writing a “sequel” or follow-up post.

If you’re really stuck, you might want to consider a ghostblogger—and of course, that’s where we come in. To learn more about ghostblogging, don’t hesitate to contact Grammar Chic today at www.grammarchic.net, or 803-831-7444.

Leave a comment

Filed under Blog Writing

The Beginner’s Guide to Business Blogging

small-business-blogs

It’s easy to assume, at this point in time, that pretty much all companies have their own blogs—simply because articles about the importance of business blogging are so numerous. (And yes: We’ve contributed a few of those articles ourselves!) In reality, though, there remain a good many companies that have yet to get on board with the merits of a sound, regularly updated business blog.

A recent NASDAQ.com article, which we love, puts the situation into simple terms: “At this point in The Age of the Customer, many people would think that defining a blog is an elementary task tantamount to explaining the wheel. But here in the real world, where Main Street small businesses live, some folks actually still have un-Tweeted thoughts. Consequently, since a blog for most small businesses is at once a powerful yet under-used customer connection tool, perhaps a little background and illumination would be beneficial.”

Yes, some illumination would be beneficial: A business blog is an ideal way of educating your customers, proving your industry know-how and authority, building trust, fueling your content marketing and social media efforts, and populating Google with strong, positive material. If your business has yet to make blogging a true marketing priority, then, we invite you to start today—and we’re happy to explain how.

The Business Blogging Bible

For those who’ve never blogged for their business before, and need a quick crash course on the best strategies, the Grammar Chic, Inc. team presents a few of the basics:

  • Your job, as a blogger, is not to be a salesman, but rather to be your customers’ mentor and advisor. In other words, your goal is to educate and inform—not to advertise. Readers don’t like blogs that just seem like non-stop product promotions—and frankly, they don’t care much about your business. What they want is to receive some kind of value—knowledge or tips that will help them solve problems or make their own lives better. Your role is to blog in a way that communicates value—underscoring your trustworthiness and industry authority, but ultimately putting the reader first.
  • Your blog may represent your business, but that doesn’t mean you should write it in stiff, robotic corporate-speak. Instead, get rid of corporate jargon and buzzwords (like cutting edge or forward-thinking) and instead write in a way that is human and relatable—grammatically flawless and professional, but also conversational.
  • If you don’t have strong, gripping headlines then you frankly don’t have much of a blog. The headline is what seduces the reader into reading the rest of the article, so a good blog needs headlines that convey value and/or attract attention with strong sensory and emotional language.
  • The same goes for the opening paragraph. Make sure that you summarize your main point, and promise specific value, early in the blog, or else readers will click on to the next thing.
  • As for the ending of your articles, make sure to offer something inspiring and actionable. If you’re offering useful tips in the blog, use your conclusion to emphasize how and why those tips should be implemented.
  • Finally, a blog that isn’t publicized via social media and email lists isn’t going to get much traction. Make sure your blog is not a stand-alone endeavor, but rather one component in your broader content marketing plan.

With these tips in mind, you’ve got a strong foundation for an effective business blog. For further assistance, including professional blogging services, contact our team today! Visit http://www.grammarchic.net, or else call 803-831-7444803-831-7444.

7 Comments

Filed under Content Marketing