Tag Archives: brand management

How Social Media Can Drive Brand Loyalty

In most areas of life, quality is of considerably greater importance than quantity. Case in point: Social media followers. It’s definitely significant for your company Facebook page to have a lot of followers, for instance, but it’s not especially meaningful if those followers don’t ultimately become faithful customers. Most businesses would surely prefer 10 followers—if they are loyal, paying customers who recommend your business to all their friends—to 100 followers who are casual and uninvolved.

And as it happens, social media can be a powerful tool for cultivating this kind of loyalty. We’ll offer you a few ways how.

Using Social Media to Enhance Brand Loyalty

Focus on value. We say this all the time, but it’s important: The best question you can ask when considering content shares is, what’s in it for my customers? Everything you offer should address their pain points or their needs, or at the very least make them chuckle. Remember to follow the 80-20 rule here, and keep roughly 80 percent of your posts strictly informative. You can directly market your company the other 20 percent. Providing real, free value over spammy self-promotion is how trust is formed.

Post with consistency. If you want your social media followers to stay connected and engaged with your brand, and to keep your company in the forefront of their mind, you’ve got to post regularly. We really recommend a post or two daily; posting once every nine months, meanwhile, is really just a waste. You might as well not post at all.

Remember the social in social media. A lot of companies post content to social media sites, but are they actually interacting with followers? That shows you’re willing to go the extra mile. Be vigilant in answering questions, responding to complaints, and being a part of your own online community.

Position your brand as the solution. When you do promote your brand directly, it shouldn’t be portrayed as just another consumer product, or a faceless online company. Instead, connect the dots. Show how your brand solves the problems your customers are facing. If you’re also building authority by giving away free, valuable information—as we noted above—then this will really help you appear as a trustworthy ally.

With a smart, strategic posting strategy, you can use social media to develop a faithful user base—and we can help you develop just such an approach. Reach out to the content marketing experts at Grammar Chic, Inc. to learn more. Connect at 803-831-7444, or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Brand Management, Content Marketing, Content Writing, Social Media

Boost Your Online Reputation in 5 Tiny Steps

You probably know the old saying about having a good reputation: It takes a lifetime to build one, but just an instant for it to be torn down. That to say, cultivating a positive reputation is hard work, both for individuals and for businesses.

But that’s not to say there aren’t some tiny steps you can take to boost perceptions of your brand, including online perceptions. In fact, online reputation management is something you can invest in every single day, by taking just a few very small, simple steps. Allow us to explain.

5 Ways to Fortify Your Online Reputation

Check Your Social Mentions

It takes just a moment to sign into Twitter to see if your brand has received any mentions; you can go a step further by doing a Twitter search for your brand name, and seeing what comes up. From there, you can check Facebook and any other social platforms on which you are active, and see if your company is being talked about. And if you do have some mentions, it’s generally a good idea to respond to them—answering any questions, offering thanks for positive mentions, providing customer service to those who have concerns or complaints.

Check Your Online Reviews

After you check social media, spend a minute looking at any online reviews you’ve accrued in the past day or so—again, Facebook is important, as are Google, Yelp, and any other platforms on which your company gets notices. Offer thanks for positive reviews; respond to negative ones appropriately.

Google Your Brand Name

It is always a smart idea to know what’s being said about your business, and to have a good sense of what people see when they search for you online. Hopefully you won’t run into anything unwelcome, but if you do, that’s a good reason to reach out to a digital marketing company. Also note that setting up a Google alert for your brand name can be a major time-saver.

Post Content

It doesn’t take too much time to share a helpful or informative article on social media—and again, there’s a way to maximize your efficiency, specifically by setting up an editorial calendar for a week’s or a month’s worth of posts. Remember that posting solid, actionable information, when it’s relevant to your brand, gives your company added authority and thought leadership.

Research Your Niche

Take five minutes to read the major blogs or publications that relate to your vertical. Take notes of any hot topics you need to address in future blogs or social media posts. Jot down any inspiration you have. Again, this is just about building thought leadership—and it can be pretty quick and painless!

Build Your Brand Through Content Marketing

There is much you can do to establish your brand as the brand of choice among consumers—and if you want to go beyond these simple steps, we can help. Learn more about the value of brand-enhancing content by reaching out to Grammar Chic, Inc. Connect with us at www.grammarchic.net or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Content Marketing, Content Writing, Social Media, Web Content

5 Ways to Turn Website Visitors into Subscribers

Getting 150,000 hits on your website is pretty good, right? Well, yeah, maybe—unless all 150,000 of your visitors leave the site without taking action. Then, it might turn out, all you’ve got is sound and fury—a lot of buzz, but nothing that directly improves your bottom line.

Traffic alone isn’t the most meaningful metric. What matters are conversions. Ideally, you want all your website visitors to buy a product from your business, though of course this is a lofty goal. A more reasonable one is to convert as many visitors as possible into subscribers; this, in turn, can help build brand loyalty and awareness, and ultimately lead these visitors down the sales funnel.

Okay—but then, how do you turn your website into a subscription hub? How do you coax as many visitors as possible into joining your inner circle? Here are five methods we’ve found to be highly effective.

How to Convert Website Visitors into Subscribers

Provide valuable content that matches user intent. What are search engine users really looking for—and how can your website provide them with relevant solutions? Those are the questions you have to ask as you develop your website content. If you’re a plumber, you can assume that search engine users are probably looking for authoritative answers to all their plumbing needs. If you’re an attorney, your users may want to know when, where, and why to engage your services. Your content should always convey valuable solutions, and provide the information search engine users are after.

Create fresh content regularly. If your website blog hasn’t been updated in a year, and if the top entry in your Company News section dates to 2011, then it may be hard for your visitors to imagine why they’d want to subscribe. You’ve got to show them that by taking the time to subscribe, they will receive meaningful updates on a regular basis.

Fill your website with diverse content. The goal here is to write content that appeals to as many different people as possible—that is, blog readers, video watchers, e-book downloaders, and so on. Be robust and varied in creating value-adding, solutions-focused content.

Include strong calls to action. If you want people to subscribe to your list, you’ve got to ask them to, and provide them with an easy lead-capturing form. Do so on every page of your website, if subscriptions are your goal.

Analyze your results. In marketing, analytics are everything. Make sure you track the results of your content, and pay attention to what works and doesn’t work in terms of subscriptions.

Does Your Website Convert?

The bottom line: Your website shouldn’t just be an online placeholder. It should be a conversion machine—and in many cases, that means a subscription generator. If you’re not seeing those results, reach out to our team for a consultation. Contact Grammar Chic at www.grammarchic.net, or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Blog Writing, Brand Management, Business Writing, Content Marketing, Web Content

Why Should You Improve Your Meta Descriptions? Because Google Says So.

Here’s a lesson from SEO 101: When Google makes announcements or recommendations, it’s always best to listen. Believe it or not, Google tries to help Web developers, marketers, and small business owners thrive in their SEO efforts, and that includes all aspects, ranging from site layout to meta descriptions.

Meta descriptions just happen to be the subject of the latest Google proclamation. In a recent announcement, Google indicated some changes to how they generate meta data—and also offers some advice for writing meta descriptions that get results.

What is a Meta Description?

Before we get into that, here’s a quick reminder: The meta description is the text you see accompanying each listing on the Google search engine results page (SERP). When you conduct a search, Google will provide you with a list of links, and under each link you’ll see some brief text that explains what the site is about. That’s Google’s way of helping users determine which of those links are most relevant to their interests.

Having a good meta description is important—but you don’t have to take our word for it. Here’s what Google says in its latest announcement: “Good meta descriptions are short blurbs that describe accurately the content of the page. They are like a pitch that convince the user that the page is exactly what they’re looking for.”

Short version: You want Google to display a really compelling meta description for your site—one that will convince people to click the link and read your content.

How Google Determines the Meta Description

So how does Google generate meta descriptions? According to the new announcement, Google’s algorithms will first scan the site itself and try to extract content that fits the search query—in other words, seeking something relevant to whatever search terms the user entered.

If Google’s bots cannot find a good passage to extract, though, they will display the meta description you wrote yourself. Of course, it’s vital to make sure that you’ve got some good, engaging text for Google to use. Google has helpfully shared some pointers on how to make your meta descriptions compelling.

What Not to Do with Your Meta Descriptions

Specifically, Google notes that meta descriptions fail for a few different reasons. One reason is that there simply isn’t one; when you forget to manually write a meta description, you’re sacrificing a key SEO opportunity.

Other common errors include using the same meta description for every page of your site; writing meta descriptions that are off-topic; or making meta descriptions that are spammy rather than informative.

One more thing: Word count. Technically, there’s no limit on your meta description, as Google will display as many characters as will fit on the device in question. Our rule of thumb is 150 characters or so, which will generally prevent your meta description from being cut off due to screen limitations.

Need Help with Your Meta Descriptions?

There is both art and science to writing good meta descriptions, and Grammar Chic, Inc. can help you strike the right balance—all while complying with Google’s directives. Let’s talk about meta descriptions, and any other content writing needs you may have. Connect with us at www.grammarchic.net, or 803-831-7444.

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Why Content Marketing is Perfect for Brand New Companies

Launching a new company is always a little daunting—and one of the greatest challenges of all is building a name and a reputation. A well-established brand like Coca Cola can fall back on decades of associations and general consumer familiarity; when you have a startup that nobody’s ever heard of, though, generating buzz can feel like an uphill climb.

One of the best ways to stake out a name for your company is to invest in content marketing. Indeed, we’d say that content marketing is uniquely helpful for brand new businesses—and we’ll tell you why.

Content Marketing Makes You Credible

Why should consumers trust you with their hard-earned money—especially when you don’t have much of a track record to fall back on? To cut through their distrust and cynicism, it’s vital that you prove yourself to be reputable and authoritative.

Content marketing can help you do that. You can display real thought leadership, and offer invaluable insight and advice. You can prove that you know what you’re talking about through helpful blog posts, how-to videos, etc.

The secret here? You have to give away content that’s actionable and valuable. That’s the only way buyers will know that they can trust you to truly help them.

Content Marketing Drives Traffic

The website of a brand-new, not-yet-established business offers limited interest to the average consumer. Social media posts and blog entries that speak more immediately to consumer needs, though—those things can grab attention. And in doing so, they can also send people to your website.

Content marketing is the gateway. It’s what gets people through the door. But once they’re in, you can use compelling calls to action to point them to your website, where you can lead them down the sales funnel. As a subset of that, you can always use content marketing to grow your contact list; for instance, by asking for a name and email address in exchange for a really compelling white paper or downloadable PDF.

Content Marketing Can Clarify Your Value Proposition

The bottom line, really, is that consumers may have a hard time wrapping their head around what, exactly, your new business offers—or what’s in it for them. Content marketing can be your vessel for identifying problems and pointing to your company as the solution. And by showcasing your know-how in a non-salesy way, you can ultimately help consumers feel more comfortable doing business with you, providing them a better sense of how you can deliver value—and how they can benefit.

If you’re starting a new business, you can use content marketing to get a head start on your branding—and we’d like to help. Have a conversation with the Grammar Chic content marketing team today: Reach out at 803-831-7444, or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Business Writing, Content Marketing, Content Writing, Social Media

5 Rules to Improve Your Email Marketing

Tired of sending emails to your subscriber list and getting nothing in return? There are some simple steps you can take to transform your email marketing campaign into a powerful, results-getting arm of your broader content marketing strategy. In this post, we’re going to break it down for you, with some foolproof tips and strategies.

Rule #1: You MUST Write Compelling Subject Lines

You’ve got a short window of time in which to make a strong first impression and to persuade your recipient to actually open and read your email. Your email subject line is where you do that, so it’s got to pop. Put some time into this. Force yourself to keep it to seven words or less. Convey value in your subject line. And make it sound personal, without including a specific recipient name. You’ll also want to keep playing around with new subject lines, A/B testing them and finding what works and what doesn’t work for your audience.

Rule #2: You MUST Segment Your Email List

Your emails need to convey value that is specific to each recipient—and while you can’t afford to write a personal email to everyone on your list, you can at least break down your list into some sub-groupings. Here at Grammar Chic, we have clients who come to us for marketing and clients who come to us for resume services, and it wouldn’t make much sense to send marketing-related emails to resume clients. That’s where segmentation becomes invaluable.

Rule #3: Your Emails MUST Offer Value

What’s in it for me? That’s what your recipients will be asking as they read your email. They need to walk away from it with something of value, whether that means news on an upcoming product, a discount, a promotion, or an actionable tip. Make sure your emails have substance. Make sure they convey value.

Rule #4: Your Email Campaign MUST Have a Clear Goal

To tell whether or not your email marketing is succeeding, you’ll need to define success. Are you looking to get phone calls? Website traffic? Buys for a specific product or service? Your email marketing objective will impact your metrics as well as your actual CTA.

Rule #5: Your Emails MUST Be Brief

Nobody has time to read a 500-word email. Get to the point. Be light and engaging. And be fun to read. Really, those are invaluable traits for any successful marketing email.

Transform Your Email Marketing

These rules will help you turn your email marketing list into a true asset. To really take things to the next level, we’d invite you to consult with our writers and email marketing pros. We can help you craft email messages that get results.

Learn more by reaching out to Grammar Chic, Inc. today, either at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Brand Management, Business Writing, Email Writing

5 Ways to Make Your Written Content More SEO-Friendly

Whether you’re writing content for your company website or dashing off the latest company blog post, you want it to be something good—something that offers value to your reader, and reflects well on your brand. At the same time, you want it to be something that’s search engine optimized. After all, great content isn’t very useful if nobody can find it.

This is a little bit of a false dichotomy, perhaps. Generally speaking, writing good, valuable content is the single best way to optimize it, and all the SEO tricks and gimmicks in the world can’t compete with the raw power of quality writing.

With that said, there is certainly a need to ensure that your content is as palatable for search algorithms as it is for human readers, and simply writing a good article is only the first step. As you seek to maximize your content’s SEO potential, here are five simple principles to keep in mind.

Improve Your On-Site SEO

Originality is Imperative

First and foremost, make sure that what you are writing stands on its own. Google doesn’t see any value in duplicate content, and as such it tends to penalize it. Regurgitating the exact same copy for each product page on your website, for instance, or simply copying text from the website to the company blog, will lead to diminished rankings. Take the time to ensure that every piece of content you write is phrased uniquely. Tools like Copyscape can help you ensure that you’re not plagiarizing yourself or others.

Readability Matters, Too

Google’s bots are more likely to favor articles that are readable to wide audiences—and that means using short sentences and paragraphs, limiting your ten-dollar words, and abstaining from the passive voice. Good, concise, punchy content—written in a way that makes it easy to read—will only help you as far as SEO rankings go.

Your Title Should Be Optimized

Writing a catchy headline is key. So is keeping the title to a Google-friendly length of 55-60 characters max. Finally make sure your URL matches the title and contents of the page; a URL that’s just random numbers hampers your SEO efforts.

Be Structured

Your content should have a structure that makes it easy for readers—and search bots—to follow along and get the basic gist of what you’re saying, even just by skimming. The best way to do this is to structure your article with H1, H2, and H3 tags to break up different sections of content. Bullet points and numbered lists can also be helpful, when applicable.

Use Keywords—Judiciously

Though you want to avoid keyword stuffing, and shouldn’t sacrifice quality for keyword count, keywords can certainly be useful in demonstrating what your content is ultimately about. We’ve blogged about the importance of judicious keyword strategy before.

Write Content That Gets Discovered

With the right approach, you can write content that pleases people and search bots alike—no easy feat, but worth it in the long run. Or, you can hire our team to write it for you. Contact Grammar Chic today to ask us about our SEO-friendly content writing services. Reach out at 803-831-7444, or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Business Writing, Web Content, Writing