Tag Archives: Business Content Marketing

5 Ways to Be Found by Local Consumers

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For any business to succeed, it needs to be discovered by local customers; it needs to bring in clients and consumers who are actually seeking the products or services in question, and willing to spend their money to get them. In today’s marketing ecosystem, that means a strong presence in local search queries.

After all, when you want to find a good local business, where do you turn for answers? More likely than not, you go to Google—and the businesses you find there are the ones most likely to win your patronage. If you want your business to thrive, then, you’ve got to position it to be embraced by local search engine users—but how?

Local SEO can sometimes be complicated and daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. There are some simple ways you can boost your visibility in local search rankings today.

Get Reviewed

Google reviews are critical to search engine success. Google takes any review to be a sign that people are engaging with your business, and gaining reviews will only help your search engine standings. Of course, it’s helpful if these are good reviews, bolstering your company’s authority and trustworthiness. If you’re not getting regular reviews, we recommend the following steps:

  • Make sure your Google review link is clearly displayed on your website
  • Actively ask your customers to leave you their feedback; include a request on invoices and receipts
  • Send an email to all your best, most loyal customers, and simply explain to them how meaningful a quick review would be
  • Include your Google review link on your email signature

Optimize for Mobile

Most local searches happen on mobile devices, so it’s critical that your website be optimized for users who are on phones or tablets; indeed, Google prioritizes sites with mobile-readiness. Check out your company website on various devices to make sure it looks good and flows smoothly. If it doesn’t, you’ll want to talk to your Web designer about switching to a mobile-friendly site ASAP.

Ensure Consistent NAP

NAP stands for Name, Address, and Phone number, and you need to have this vital contact information displayed on every page of your website. Make sure you state it the exact same way every time, too. Inconsistencies—“Al’s Pancakes” on one page and “Al’s Pancake House” on another, or even listing your address as “Main Street” here but “Main St.” there—can drop your Google ranking.

Get Local Links

Reach out to local directories, business bureaus, and chambers of commerce to get a link to your website—along with NAP information, consistent with the way you list it on your site.

Write Valuable Content

Finally, a website that’s dense with valuable content—not just sales pitches, but information that addresses consumer questions—is going to get more love from Google, for the simple reason that it offers a better product to Google’s customers (i.e. search engine users). A good website with FAQs, how-tos, detailed product descriptions, and a regular blog can go a long way.

Grammar Chic can help with all of these content creation needs, of course. Learn more by reaching out to our team today at www.grammarchic.net or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Business Writing, Content Marketing

Big Changes to Google’s Star Systems (And What They Mean for You)

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Here’s a hypothetical for you: Say you’re looking to purchase a new product of some kind, but you don’t really know much about it, or where to get it. You need to gather some information. You need to do some research. So where do you head? The answer, of course, is Google. That’s where consumers do their research these days—and it’s where they make most of their decisions about which products to buy and which local businesses to visit.

One way in which consumers make their purchasing decisions is to consult with Google’s star system. If you see a local company with a one-star rating, you’d probably think twice before giving them your business, right? You’d at least look around for competitors. And on the flipside, if a business has a five-star Google score, you’d feel a lot more confident shopping there.

The implication for businesses is that Google star ratings matter—they matter for your bottom line. That’s why, when Google makes changes to its star system, small business owners need to sit up and take notice.

What’s Changed with Google’s Star System?

As it happens, Google has made changes to its star rating scale. Here’s the change: It used to be that Google only gave star ratings for businesses with at least five reviews. Now, Google has lowered the threshold—and some businesses are receiving Google ratings on the basis of a single review!

What this means is that, more than ever before, every single online review you get matters. A single one-star review could totally sink your Google score, especially if it’s the only review you have. Meanwhile, a single five-star review could be all it takes to send your company toward a perfect score.

How to Be Proactive About Your Google Reviews

Our advice to business owners: Don’t leave your Google stars to chance. Be proactive in getting your full five-star score! Here are some tips:

  • Make sure your Google review link is clearly displayed on your website and on social media profiles.
  • Actively ask your customers to leave you their feedback. Include a request on invoices and receipts.
  • Go as far as to send an email to all your best, most loyal customers, and simply explain to them how meaningful a quick review would be.
  • Sweeten the deal! Offer a $5 Starbucks gift card or a promo code to people who take the time to leave you a review.
  • Include your Google review link on your email signature.

There are a lot of strategies that can get results, and we’d love to help you execute a good one. Contact Grammar Chic today to learn more! Reach out to our team at www.grammarchic.net or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Brand Management, Business Writing, Content Marketing, Social Media

5 Ways to Improve Your Website’s Internal Linking

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Internal linking is one of the backbones of search engine optimization. It’s one of the things that separates a mediocre website from a truly stellar one. Providing links that connect the different pages of your website is a small and simple thing you can do that could yield big results.

Internal linking is significant for a number of reasons. One is that it makes it easier for Google search bots to crawl your pace. Another, just as important reason is that it makes it easier for your customers to find the information they want. Internal links keep people on your page, which reduces your bounce rate, and they can also boost the SEO value of the pages you’re linking.

The bottom line? Spending some time on an internal linking strategy is certainly prudent, and can certainly pay off. The question is, what can you do to get internal linking right?

Here are five tricks of the trade.

Link to Content-Heavy Pages

Let’s say you write a 1,000-word blog post. You definitely want to insert a couple of internal links, but you don’t want to waste them on parts of your website that are low on content value—like a generic “Contact Us” page.

Think about it this way: The pages you link to should be resources for your reader, providing them with additional information that enhances their experience. As such, it’s best to link to pages that provide further details or delve into related topics… pages that actually provide enriching, value-adding content, not just boilerplate.

Use Descriptive Anchor Text

The anchor text refers to the actual words on the page that you make into a hyperlink—and choosing the right anchor text can add real value to those links. That’s why you never want to link to bland, boring, or valueless text like click here.

Consider this: You want to provide a link to a recent blog post about the best Instagram strategies. You can make the words blog post into your anchor text, or the words best Instagram strategies. Which of these do you think offers more link value? The more descriptive option is always going to be the better one. Be wise in including good, colorful anchor text with every link.

Include a Couple of Internal Links on Every Page

How many internal links should you feature in each post, or on each page? There’s no hard and fast rule here, and different SEOs will tell you different things, but we’d recommend at least a couple. Remember that each link boosts the “freshness value” of the page you’re linking to, so you might as well take advantage of each opportunity.

Be Logical with Your Links

With that said, we also recommend being wise: You don’t want to appear like you’re spamming your reader, or bombarding your website users with links. Make sure the links you include are relevant. For example, a Grammar Chic blog post about Facebook ads probably shouldn’t link to a separate post about resume writing. That’s just not a logical connection.

Update Your Links Often

Remember that broken links decrease your site usability and its SEO value. Meanwhile, when you write a really good piece of new content, you may want to include links to it from older, relevant posts. Routine link audits and updates are essential.

Of course, linking is an integral part of your broader content marketing strategy—and that’s something the Grammar Chic team can help you put into place. Learn more by calling us today for a free consultation. Reach Grammar Chic’s content marketing team at 803-831-7444, or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Blog Writing, Brand Management, Web Content

7 Ways to Get Maximum Value from Your Company Blog Posts

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Just because you hit publish on a new company blog post, share it on social media, and email it to the folks on your subscription list, doesn’t mean the blog post is through. On the contrary, there are plenty of ways to repurpose older content and wring more value from it.

There are many benefits to repurposing old content, regardless of whether that content performed well or it didn’t. If you’ve got a blog post that failed you, repurposing it might allow you to give it a new lease on life—to salvage it and derive some value from all your hard work. Conversely, if you have a really popular and high-performing post, repurposing it can allow you to harness that momentum and reach even more people with your message.

And there are a number of effective ways to breathe new life into an older blog post, too. Here are seven that the Grammar Chic team recommends.

Update Older Posts

In most industries, trends shift and best practices change over time. As such, it may be worthwhile to revisit your most popular posts every year or so and see if a new iteration is needed. You can revise an older post with new statistics or trends, then share it all over again.

Optimize Older Posts

It can also be worth revisiting older posts to tweak their SEO features—inserting new title tags, meta descriptions, and keywords for some of your most effective posts, drawing on new analytics and more recent data.

Turn a Blog Post into an Infographic

Pull out the main talking points and put them into image form. Then share that image widely on your social media platforms!

Break Down Larger Posts

Often, a comprehensive, big-picture post can be whittled down into three or four smaller posts, which delve into specific topics a little more deeply. Provide readers with one overview post, and then some smaller supporting posts that get down into the nitty gritty.

Turn Long Posts into Downloadable Offers

You can also expand your more in-depth posts and format them into e-books or white papers, making them available as downloads on your company website.

Use Your Blog as Fodder for a Webinar

We’re big believers in webinars, and we know that sometimes a popular blog post can provide the blueprint you need for a really compelling online presentation.

Split a Post into an Email Series

A final thought: You can dissect a blog post and draw a few 50-to-100-word blurbs from it, then use those in an email series—a great way of providing added value to your subscribers!

Of course, all of this starts with creating compelling blog posts—and for that, we’re here to help. Contact the ghostwriting team at Grammar Chic today at www.grammarchic.net, or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Blog Writing, Business Writing, Content Marketing, Social Media

Help Your Employees Fall in Love with Content Marketing

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Here’s a little Valentine’s Day challenge for you: do something that makes your team members fall in love with content marketing. Instead of keeping your blog writing and social media posting in a silo, open it up for the entire company to own a stake in. Get the buy-in of key players in your organization, and start benefitting from their ideas, their inspiration, and their encouragement.

An impossible task, you say? Not at all. There are things you can start doing right now to make your content marketing more inclusive, and to bring non-marketing team members into the process.

It All Starts with Education

The first step is ensuring your colleagues and employees all know what content marketing actually is, and why it’s valuable. Have you ever hosted an employee in-service where you go over the content marketing basics? You can do it in a half an hour, probably, perhaps during a lunch meeting some day. Think of a way and a time when you can make the case for content marketing, and ensure everyone at your company has at least a basic idea of why it’s worth their support. Connect it to other departments, too; for example, make sure you explain how content marketing makes life easier for customer service reps, and how it brings in leads for the sales department.

Have a Vision

It’s important for people to know what content marketing is, but also how you want to portray the brand through content marketing. What are your values? What are the aspects of the company you want to emphasize? What are some of the buzzwords you use, the pieces of verbiage you employ when talking about your brand? Share all these things with the team. Provide them with a written reference/guide they can call upon, too.

Ask Team Members to Share Content

Most of the team members in your workplace will have personal Facebook and Twitter accounts—invaluable platforms for sharing the company’s blog posts and status updates. You can’t force them to do this, of course, and shouldn’t try—but it never hurts to ask. Express how meaningful it would be, and you may by surprised by how many employees rise to the challenge.

Seek Input

Once you’ve schooled your co-workers on what content marketing is and why it matters, you’re in a place where you can ask them for their feedback on current content endeavors. What’s working? What changes would they recommend? Take their feedback seriously. Also note that customer service and sales reps, who deal with customers directly, may have some great avenues for new topics—frequently asked questions from customers and leads.

Provide Tools for Collaboration

Finally, make it easy for team members to share images, memes, questions, articles, or anything else they think will be useful for the company’s content marketing endeavors. Something like a Dropbox or Google Drive folder can be just perfect. Simply offering a convenient, hassle-free way to submit content and ideas is a great way of involving others in the process.

The important thing is to open the doors of your content marketing mission; allow other team members to come alongside you. It can only make your efforts sharper, stronger, and more effective. Also, don’t hesitate to bring in the pros from Grammar Chic. Reach out to us at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net for a content marketing consultation.

 

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Filed under Content Marketing, Social Media

Why Your Facebook Ads Aren’t Working

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Over the last few years, Facebook has subtly but significantly shifted its focus toward paid ads. While it remains highly important to distribute valuable content and to seek organic reach, it’s just as vital for businesses to pony up for some paid Facebook ads. Companies that don’t pay to play may not receive as much traction in Facebook news feeds.

The good news is that Facebook’s ad platform is a powerful one, providing both a broad reach and the ability to narrowly target the people who see your ads. The bad news is that it can be hard even to understand Facebook’s ad platform, much less optimize it—especially if you’re relatively new to Facebook advertising.

The Grammar Chic team has ample experience with Facebook’s ad manager. We know what works, but also what doesn’t. If you’ve tried your hand at Facebook ads and not gotten the results you’d like, there are a few potential reasons why.

Poor Targeting

The first potential reason is that you just haven’t honed your audience enough. Though it may seem counterintuitive, it’s actually better to target a very specific audience than a wide one. Simply put: When you target with precision, you increase the likelihood that your ad will truly resonate with the reader.

Buyer personas can come in handy here. Before you start work on a Facebook ad, really think about who you’re trying to reach—basic demographic information, values, pain points, etc.

Poor Headline

Another potential issue? A headline that doesn’t grab the reader. In the age of Facebook, attention spans aren’t what they used to be, and it’s important to choose a heading that really conveys the value of your product or service.

Directness is key. You want something that will register with people who are quickly skimming through Facebook—so avoid the temptation of making your headline too clever. Instead, simply articulate the value you can offer to readers. Say what’s in it for them.

Poor Image Selection

Your Facebook ads should include images; those without images tend to receive much less engagement, sometimes just a fraction of the engagement that a good image will bring. Actually picking the right image can be tricky, and may require some trial and error.

Our advice is to remember that your ad will show up in people’s newsfeeds, and you want it to look like it belongs there. Something casual and organic—a photo of people using your product, for instance—may be a better option than something glossy and staged.

Poor Landing Page

One more note: When people click on your Facebook ad, they should be taken to a specific landing page—not to a generic home page. You want them to land somewhere they’ll receive specific information about the content of your ad, and ultimately where you can convert them into clients.

A good landing page shouldn’t have too much information, but it should clearly state your value proposition—and it should close in a strong call to action.

Make Your Facebook Ads More Effective

Your Facebook ads can have a major effect—and to make that happen, we encourage you to meet with our team. Grammar Chic can help you craft compelling ad copy, write beautiful landing pages, and ultimately get a strong Facebook ad strategy into place.

Contact us to learn more, at 803-831-7444, or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Content Marketing, Social Media

7 Content Marketing Mistakes You Can’t Afford to Make in 2017

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Many of us are still in the leaf-turning phase of the new year, eager to identify and implement key areas for personal and professional change. Perhaps some of your own resolutions include improvements to your company’s content marketing endeavors. And if not—well, maybe they should.

There is never a bad time to revise your content marketing mechanisms—to be more strategic about consumer outreach, relationship-building, and thought leadership. Getting more serious about content marketing can yield many benefits, and the good news is, making constructive content marketing resolutions doesn’t have to be anything too nebulous or complex: It can be as simple as learning from yesterday’s mistakes.

With that in mind, we’ve got some suggestions for you: Some content marketing mistakes we’ve seen before, and ones we encourage you to learn from as you move forward toward bigger and better content endeavors.

Mistake #1: Blogging Inconsistently

Anyone can resolve to start a blog. Even writing that first post can seem pretty easy. Maintaining robust and regular blog content, though, is another matter altogether—yet it requires consistency for you to keep your audience engaged, increase our search engine exposure, and develop your brand’s authority.

Mistake #2: Making Grade-School Grammar Mistakes

Be honest: Have you ever posted a company blog that interchanges your with you’re, or that mixes up their and there? These aren’t just little errors. They make your business look shoddy and unprofessional. Make sure you have a skilled editor proof your content before it’s posted.

Mistake #3: Overlooking SEO Opportunities

You don’t have to be a technical whiz to fill in the meta description for your company blog post (WordPress and other content management systems will offer you a place to do this), or to include a few judicious keywords in your posts and your titles. Don’t forfeit these opportunities to tell the search engine what your content is all about.

Mistake #4: Missing Email Marketing Opportunities

Remember that when you post a really good entry to your blog, it’s something you ought to be promoting everywhere—and that includes in emails. Your email marketing list is a great place to turn when you want to get attention for a new piece of content. Spread the word, and make sure you’re conveying real value to your readers.

Mistake #5: Misusing Social Media

Your Facebook and Twitter accounts aren’t just for promoting your latest products or sales, though that’s certainly a good use for them. You should also be using them to spread meaningful, value-adding content, though—not just your company blog posts, but curated content from other industry resources, too.

Mistake #6: Poorly Formatting Your Content

Are your company blog posts difficult to read—or difficult to skim? Sub-headings, lists, and bullet points can really make life easier for your readers. If nothing else, shorter paragraphs are generally recommended.

Mistake #7: Not Offering Value Through Your Content

It ultimately comes down to what you’re writing about: You should be developing content that truly makes life better for your readers, answering their questions and posing actionable solutions to their problems. Otherwise, why would they bother?

Content development happens to be our strong suit—so if you’re looking for a hand in making big content improvements in 2017, give Grammar Chic a call at 803-831-7444, or visit us at www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Brand Management, Content Marketing, Content Writing, Email Writing, Social Media