Tag Archives: Business Content Marketing

5 Rules to Improve Your Email Marketing

Tired of sending emails to your subscriber list and getting nothing in return? There are some simple steps you can take to transform your email marketing campaign into a powerful, results-getting arm of your broader content marketing strategy. In this post, we’re going to break it down for you, with some foolproof tips and strategies.

Rule #1: You MUST Write Compelling Subject Lines

You’ve got a short window of time in which to make a strong first impression and to persuade your recipient to actually open and read your email. Your email subject line is where you do that, so it’s got to pop. Put some time into this. Force yourself to keep it to seven words or less. Convey value in your subject line. And make it sound personal, without including a specific recipient name. You’ll also want to keep playing around with new subject lines, A/B testing them and finding what works and what doesn’t work for your audience.

Rule #2: You MUST Segment Your Email List

Your emails need to convey value that is specific to each recipient—and while you can’t afford to write a personal email to everyone on your list, you can at least break down your list into some sub-groupings. Here at Grammar Chic, we have clients who come to us for marketing and clients who come to us for resume services, and it wouldn’t make much sense to send marketing-related emails to resume clients. That’s where segmentation becomes invaluable.

Rule #3: Your Emails MUST Offer Value

What’s in it for me? That’s what your recipients will be asking as they read your email. They need to walk away from it with something of value, whether that means news on an upcoming product, a discount, a promotion, or an actionable tip. Make sure your emails have substance. Make sure they convey value.

Rule #4: Your Email Campaign MUST Have a Clear Goal

To tell whether or not your email marketing is succeeding, you’ll need to define success. Are you looking to get phone calls? Website traffic? Buys for a specific product or service? Your email marketing objective will impact your metrics as well as your actual CTA.

Rule #5: Your Emails MUST Be Brief

Nobody has time to read a 500-word email. Get to the point. Be light and engaging. And be fun to read. Really, those are invaluable traits for any successful marketing email.

Transform Your Email Marketing

These rules will help you turn your email marketing list into a true asset. To really take things to the next level, we’d invite you to consult with our writers and email marketing pros. We can help you craft email messages that get results.

Learn more by reaching out to Grammar Chic, Inc. today, either at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Brand Management, Business Writing, Email Writing

5 Things That Compromise Your Mobile SEO

When someone pulls out their smartphone to search for a local business—whether they’re sitting at home on the couch or walking down the street, plotting the next phase of their errand-running—you want them to find your business. That’s why you have invested in a good mobile website. It’s why you keep up with the rigors of mobile SEO.

But be careful: There are a number of things that can cause those mobile SEO efforts to fall flat. Here are just a few of them—things to be careful of as you try to reach as many mobile consumers as you can.

Where Mobile SEO Goes Wrong

Slow Site Speed

Did you know that a majority of Google search users say they give up on a site if it takes more than three seconds to load? Three seconds! That’s not a lot of time to get your page up and running. Do some tests, on multiple devices, to make sure it loads quickly—and if it doesn’t, talk with your developer about how to speed things up. (Some possible solutions: Remove large images and video files from your home page, or create shorter content for your mobile pages.)

Pop-Up Ads

Not only are pop-ups potentially draining to your site speed, but they can also take up the entirety of a mobile browser screen—and if they are hard to get rid of, users will likely just navigate away. Even if your pop-up has a really killer CTA, you should think seriously about jettisoning it.

Unplayable Content

Does your video/multimedia content play properly on all types of devices? Are you sure? Not only does this content cause slow speeds (again), but it can be really frustrating when it doesn’t work—and it frequently doesn’t.

Generally Bad Mobile Design

Your site should be easy to read and to navigate on all types of mobile device—period. Tiny fonts, cluttered screens, hyperlink text that can’t be read—these are all deal-breakers.

Bland or Mushy Content

Mobile users need you to get right to the point, which means your content should immediately convey value—and come with plenty of strong calls to action. If it doesn’t, you shouldn’t be surprised when the site fails to make much of an impact.

Step Up Your Mobile SEO

There are a number of potential problems that can drag down your mobile SEO efforts—but none of them are problems without solutions.

If your issue is content-related—if you don’t know the best way to make your value proposition punchy, or if you need help crafting the perfect CTA—we’d love to talk with you.

Contact the Grammar Chic content writing team for a consultation today. Reach us at 803-831-7444, or www.grammarchic.net.

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6 User Experience Errors That Will Sink Your Content Marketing

We’re often asked about the best strategies to marry content marketing with effective SEO. The basic premise is really simple: If you want to find favor with search engine algorithms, it’s important to first find favor with human readers. Making your content easy to discover, to read, and to digest—that’s all Google really wants you to do.

An implication of this is that, if you sacrifice the user experience—if you create content that doesn’t provide value to the reader, or that makes that value difficult to excavate—it’s inevitable that you’ll see a drop-off in Google traction.

This introduces a question. Is your content user-friendly? Or, to come at it from a different angle, are you doing anything in your company blog posts and in your Web content that’s compromising the user experience—and, thus, sinking your SEO?

Allow us to point out just a few common user experience errors that can make your content difficult to digest—and thus, less likely to find favor with Google’s algorithms.

Where Content Marketing Goes Wrong

Insufficient Substance/Length

We’ve blogged recently about word count, and about how there’s no simple answer to the question of how long your content should be. With that said, the basic principle to keep in mind is that you need to offer value without fluff—and a blog post that’s just 200 words probably isn’t fully addressing your readers’ questions. Aim for posts that really tackle your topic thoroughly and substantively; skimpy posts do not provide for a satisfying user experience any more than overly long, rambling ones do.

Bland and Boring Layouts

What’s the old saying about pictures and words? Well, we’d say you need both. A boring, black-and-white layout isn’t going to capture the reader’s attention. Make sure you embed pictures, videos, and other rich and colorful content into your blog posts and throughout your website.

Misspellings or Bad Grammar

If your content is laden with typos, it’s not going to come across as trustworthy or authoritative—so you can’t expect to see much in the way of backlinks. Readers won’t put up with poorly proofed content for long.

Unbroken Content

You need content breaks to make your posts easier to maneuver—and to skim. Make sure you break things down with section subheadings, bullet points, lists, etc.

Rambling Paragraphs

Similarly, avoid unbroken streams of text that just run on and on forever. Short paragraphs are key!

No Call to Action

A good blog post or website will direct the reader to what they need to do next; it will crystalize their action steps. That’s what a CTA is all about—so don’t neglect them!

Write Content That Gets Read

Our suggestion for you? Talk with Grammar Chic about improving the user experience in your content. We know how to write content that gets read—and content that gets ranked. Reach out to us at 803-831-7444, or at www.grammarchic.net, to start a conversation.

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Why Small Businesses Don’t Pursue Content Marketing

The benefits of content marketing are well-established. If anything, they have only been vindicated and solidified in recent years, with more and more marketing firms doubling down on content and study after study confirming content marketing’s mettle.

Those benefits—increased brand visibility and authority, more consumer trust, qualified leads, thought leadership—would seem like no-brainers for small business owners, but actually, some small companies remain resistant to content marketing. There are a few reasons why.

Reasons Against Content Marketing

A Lack of Strategy

One reason why small business owners shy away from making a content investment is that they just aren’t sure what they want to do with it—draw traffic to their website? Increase their brand prestige? Educate leads? Remarket to previous customers? To make content marketing work, you need to know what you’re trying to accomplish, something you can determine through talking over the possibilities with a firm like Grammar Chic.

A Lack of Time

Some small business owners, knowing full well that content marketing is an ongoing process, are worried about time commitments. That’s not really an argument against content marketing, though; rather, it’s an argument for bringing in a content development team. This will require a bit of a time commitment on the front end, as you work to get the content developers up to speed on your brand, but over time it can really be an efficient way to work.

Brand Concerns

If your company is a funeral home, an accounting office, or an automotive F&I provider, you might think that what you do just isn’t sexy enough for content marketing—but actually, all brands can benefit from cultivating trust and displaying thought leadership, and all companies can find a content angle that works for them.

Industry Red Tape

Highly regulated industries, such as financial planning firms and law practices, will impose some rules about what you can and cannot say in content marketing. This can be frustrating, but it doesn’t mean there isn’t a way to write content that is valuable to your consumers.

Lack of Talent

You may not be a writer, plain and simple—and that’s okay! There are other ways for you to create content. Plus, you can always outsource the writing to a firm like Grammar Chic, where writing is what we do all day, every day.

Insufficient Data

Establishing a content marketing strategy will give you a data-backed baseline which you can then use to prove ROI. For your first month or two, you won’t have that kind of data, but really the only way to get it is to start putting up some content.

Overcoming Obstacles to Content Marketing

The bottom line: With the right counsel, you can work your way around any content marketing objective—and start reaping those benefits! Start the process today by reaching out to our team at Grammar Chic, Inc. You can visit us online at www.grammarchic.net or we invite you to call 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Business Writing, Content Marketing, Content Writing, Social Media

How to Write Copy for Facebook Ads

We’re big believers in using Facebook as a channel for good, engaging content—but as we’ve noted in the past, content marketing isn’t necessarily sufficient all on its own. Facebook increasingly forces marketers to pair their organic content with paid ads; if you don’t play ball, don’t be surprised when your organic posts start slipping out of newsfeeds, and your overall engagement starts to tank.

In other words, Facebook basically makes you pony up for paid ads—if you really want your Facebook marketing efforts to bear fruit, anyway. But there are other reasons to use the Facebook Ads platform, as well. Simply put, Facebook Ads is a really good advertising platform. It allows all manner of advanced targeting and audience segmentation, which means that, if you know how to use it, you can really get a lot of bang for your buck, without wasting a lot of ad dollars.

We’re not going to get into all of that today, but we are going to highlight one especially important part of the Facebook Ads process—and that’s copywriting. Facebook will allow you to include an image, headline, and body text with each ad, and it’s imperative that all three components are firing on all cylinders. The engagement you get from your ads hinges on the harmonious functioning of these three items.

Tips for Writing Compelling Facebook Ads Copy

So, to begin with, you should have an image in mind. Starting with the image is the best way to go. If you’re working with a graphic designer, commission the image before you finalize your text; if you’re doing it by yourself, find the image you want to use first, then write copy to match it. Remember to let the image do a lot of the talking; you don’t need to use your limited copy space to explain or describe the image. People can see it for themselves.

Speaking of which, remember your character limits. You only get 25 characters for your headline, and 90 for your body text. Brevity is key!

Lead with value. You want the reader of your ad to do something—click through to your website, LIKE your company Facebook page, or something similar. Your headline and your ad copy should tell the reader what’s in it for them if they take that action. Explain the benefit to reading your ad and doing what it says.

Include strong verbs. Make sure your entire ad copy reads like a call to action, including verbs to indicate the actions you want your readers to take.

Remember who you’re writing for. Your Facebook ads will be targeted to a specific audience, which should match up with one of your own buyer personas or customer demographics. Knowing who you are writing for can provide some invaluable insight into how you write your copy—which values to highlight, which pain points to address, etc.

Test everything. Write a few variants on your headline and test them against each other; keep track of which headlines get results and which don’t, and use that as a template for future copywriting.

Get Help with Your Facebook Ads

A final thought: You can always outsource your Facebook Ads copywriting to the pros. Grammar Chic’s team can deliver ad text that is short, punchy, and powerful. Talk with us about it. Visit us online at www.grammarchic.net or call 803-831-7444.

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3 Reasons Your Email Marketing Doesn’t Work

Email is an incredible and still-undervalued marketing tool—one that allows you to reach out to both past and potential clients directly with a personalized message and a tailored value proposition. It’s something we use for our own marketing here at Grammar Chic, Inc., and it’s something we recommend for our clients.

Sometimes, though, the best intentions for an email marketing campaign fall short, and emails are sent out without any kind of response coming back. Sometimes, email marketing just plain doesn’t work—and when that happens, it’s important to ask yourself why.

There are a number of possible reasons, but really three main ones—and today we want to look closer at each of them.

You Haven’t Segmented Your List

Email is best used in a highly targeted way, with messages being tailored to segments of your subscription list. For example, here at Grammar Chic, we have some clients for our resume writing division and other clients within our marketing wing. If we’re sending out a promotion for content marketing services, it doesn’t make as much sense to send it to the resume crew. Instead, we’d tailor it to the part of our email list that comes to us for marketing expertise.

Make sure you work with your email list to divide it and segment it into different audiences—and that your message always mirrors the people you’re sending it to.

Your Headline Doesn’t Grab Attention

This is always the struggle with email marketing: How do you grab attention and make your email stand out within busy inboxes? The headline is everything—your best and only chance at a strong first impression.

Some basic tips for writing good email headlines:

  • Keep it brief—seven words or less!
  • Avoid words that will run you afoul of spam filters—Sale, Free, 50% Off, etc.
  • Be clear about your value proposition; how will the reader benefit from reading your email?

You’re Not Clear in Your Value Proposition

And that brings us to the final point: Some emails don’t work because they just don’t have much to say. Everything from your headline to your body text to your call to action should spell out the value you’re offering to readers—the “what’s in it for me” of reading your message and responding to your CTA at the bottom. If your value offer is unclear, readers just won’t know what to do with your message.

These are all potentially fatal blows to your email marketing campaign, but the good news is that all of them can be corrected. The first step is to meet with the email marketing strategists at Grammar Chic, Inc. Contact us about a consultation today, either at www.grammarchic.net or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Blog Writing, Business Writing, Content Marketing, Email Writing, Social Media

How to Write Great Content for Short Attention Spans

There is always more and more online content vying for readers’ attention—yet it seems like the average online attention span is getting shorter all the time.

This is something that any content marketer has to take into consideration. You need your content to be read and interacted with, yet your audience may have very little patience to sit through anything that isn’t totally optimized to keep them engaged.

So how do you optimize your written content? Here are a few tips to consider.

Start with Buyer Personas

People are going to be a lot more willing to read your content if it feels like it was written directly for them. That’s why you need to start with your audience, and ideally with a well-composed buyer persona. What are the pain points you need to address? What are the values? What kind of language should you be using—highly technical or extremely casual? And what do your readers ultimately want to gain from your content? To answer these questions, you have to have a pretty good sense of who you’re writing to.

Structure it Well

It’s also important to make sure you organize your content in a way that makes it easier to read—and, for that matter, to skim. Some ways to do so include:

  • Write in short paragraphs
  • Avoid long sentences
  • Use subject headings to break up the content
  • Use bulleted lists whenever you can
  • Make sure you end with a good summary of your main takeaways/action steps

Don’t Let Your Words Stand Alone

A plain black-and-white page of text is inevitably going to be a little boring, and strain the average reader’s attention span. Images, infographics, and embedded videos can spice things up significantly, while also helping to break up the content and make it more digestible.

Be Clear in Your Value Proposition

Put yourself in the shoes of your reader, and ask: What’s in it for me? The reader should be able to walk away from your content with some value, some specific benefit. You need to emphasize that value up front, both in your headline and in your introduction, ideally in the first paragraph. Let readers know that they will see a benefit from reading your content.

Don’t Be Afraid to Go Long

A final note: Short attention spans do not necessarily call for short content. There is still plenty of room for articles that go in-depth and provide more specific value. In fact, a reader with a short attention span may prefer these articles; a flimsy blog post may seem like a waste of time, while something more substantive may seem like it’s a lot more worthwhile.

You can create content that engages even the ficklest reader—but if you need an extra hand in enhancing your content, don’t hesitate to give us a call. Grammar Chic can help you write content that gets read and engaged with. Learn more at www.grammarchic.net, or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Blog Writing, Business Writing, Content Marketing, Content Writing, Social Media, Web Content