Tag Archives: Content Writing

7 Tips on Writing Compelling Thought Leadership Articles

Thought leadership articles provide a tried-and-true method for establishing your credibility, raising awareness of your brand, and positioning yourself as a trusted figure within your field.

But what makes for a persuasive thought leadership article? Expertise is certainly part of it; to be seen as a thought leader, you really do have to know what you’re talking about. That’s just one part of the equation. Clarity of communication is also key. And there’s no substitute for point of view. To be seen as a thought leader, you’ll need to bring a perspective that’s appreciably different from the industry consensus.

As you prepare to write a thought leadership article, here are a few steps to make it as compelling as can be.

How to Write Effective Thought Leadership Articles

1) Know your field.

First and foremost, recognize that you’re not an expert in everything, but you probably are an expert in something. Think through your core business value proposition, and about the ways you make life better for your customer and clients. Also think through your distinctives: What separates you from others in your field? A careful self-assessment should reveal some insights regarding your true expertise.

2) Research your industry.

One way to hone your point of view is to get a better sense of what others are saying. Research leading publications within your field. See what people are talking about on social media. Interview some of the people you identify as thought leaders. Get to know the lay of the land, so that when you articulate your unique point of view, it will be more than just a rootless opinion.

3) Provide a clear thesis.

A good thought leadership article takes a stand. For example, say you’re writing an article about the use of PPC ads in small business marketing campaigns. Your article should state, relatively early on, whether you think PPC ads are a wise investment or an unwise investment for your target audience. In short: Pick a side! Let your audience know that you stand for something.

4) Articulate benefits.

What will readers gain from your article? What kinds of actionable insights will you provide? Good thought leadership articles are clear in expressing value. This may mean breaking down a complex idea into easy-to-understand terms. It may mean listing specific recommendations for your readers to follow. Or it may mean enriching your reader’s perspective by offering a unique or contrarian point of view on a familiar topic.

5) Share anecdotes and experience.

To establish yourself as a credible thought leader, you need to offer plenty of evidence that you’ve wrestled with the issues you’re writing about, not just theoretically but in the real business world. Make sure you weave in plenty of specific stories and examples from your personal or professional life.

6) Include data points.

Anecdotes are invaluable, but when possible, it’s also wise to include actual numbers. Again, the goal is to show that your thought leadership isn’t just baseless opinion. Cite trustworthy publications or your own in-house findings.

7) Attach a bio.

Finally, good thought leadership articles can be bolstered by a brief yet impactful professional bio, simply reiterating your credentials. If nothing else, a link to your website or LinkedIn profile can go a long way.

Questions About Writing Thought Leadership Articles?

Writing persuasive thought leadership articles can have a major impact on your reputation and statute… but it’s not necessarily an easy thing to do. Take the stress out of this process and partner with a professional ghostwriter who will consult with you to create compelling thought leadership. Reach out to Grammar Chic, Inc. at www.grammarchic.net, or by calling 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Blog Writing, Content Writing, Writing

Don’t Let Writer’s Block Derail Your Content Strategy

Writer’s block can strike the best of us; just ask James Caan’s character in Misery. And while it can certainly be a lethal affliction for fiction writers, it’s just as unsettling for content marketers. If you’ve ever found yourself on a tight deadline for a company blog post, press release, or email newsletter, you know just how little wiggle-room there is. The last thing you need is to waste precious time waiting for inspiration to strike.

There’s no magic formula for banishing writer’s block, but there are a few simple remedies that can help get your creative juices flowing. Here are a few tricks and tips from Grammar Chic’s writers.

How to Deal with Writer’s Block

  • Walk away for a little while. You won’t accomplish much by banging your head against the desk, or by staring at a blank screen. So why not go for a walk? Get your blood pumping a little bit. Step outside to soak up some sun or make a quick phone call. Spend 15 minutes playing a mindless iPhone game and see if that helps you clear your head. You can’t put off your deadline forever, but you can take short breaks.
  • Always be looking for inspiration. You never know when a billboard or a line in your favorite TV show will inspire a company blog post. Be ready to jot down these inspiration points on your Notes app and consult it when you feel low on ideas.
  • Work when you know you’re at your most focused and creative. Some of us have our best ideas early in the morning. Others tend to perk up toward the end of the day. If you’re the kind of person who just always feels blank first thing in the AM, then choose a different time to get your writing done.
  • Ask for ideas. You know who probably has some great ideas for your next company blog post or newsletter? Your sales reps, who talk to customers day in and day out and know what some of the common questions and pain points are. Don’t hesitate to go to them for inspiration.
  • Just start writing. You may have no idea what your next piece of content is going to look like… but you can always write something: A list of keywords, questions, or even a simple outline. Even if you’re just regurgitating a precious blog post, the act of writing can often inspire fresh ideas.
  • Outsource your efforts. If your writer’s block becomes chronic, you may want to hire someone who can help you shape some new ideas. The Grammar Chic team would be happy to step in as needed.

Reach Out to Grammar Chic, Inc.

Do you feel inspired to learn more about our content writing services? If so, then let’s set up a time to chat. Reach out to Grammar Chic, Inc. by visiting www.grammarchic.net, or by calling our office at 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Content Marketing, Content Writing

6 Signs You Need to Rewrite Your Web Content

A good website is more than the sum of its parts. Certainly, you need logical navigation, clean graphic design, strong calls to action, and a robust internal linking strategy, among other considerations. And don’t forget about your written content! The written copy on your website is crucially important for educating and persuading customers, for gaining SEO traction, and for conveying the vision and values of your company.

Web content isn’t meant to last forever. On the contrary, it’s a good idea to revise your copywriting every two or three years. This gives you a chance to offer fresh content to the Google algorithms, and also to refine or update your company’s messaging.

Beyond that, there are a few telltale signs that your Web copy could stand an update… whether you rewrite it yourself, or enlist the expertise of Grammar Chic, Inc.

Signs You Need Fresh Web Copywriting

1) Your Google traction is slipping

One of the most important aspects of copywriting is that it signals to Google what your company is all about, and how your website should be categorized. If you’re not getting the kind of Google traffic you’d like, it’s possible that bad copy is to blame… and that a content refresh could put you back on Google’s radar.

2) You’re not getting calls or inquiries.

Ideally, your website is a 24/7 sales machine, directing interested consumers to call, text, or email you about your products and services. Make sure you track where your leads come from, and if you find that it’s seldom from your website, that should be a red flag: Your Web copy isn’t doing its job.

3) Your branding has changed.

It’s natural for companies to grow and evolve… and your website should grow and evolve with it. For example, say you started your company 10 years ago, with the intention of being an all-purpose plumbing service. But in the years since, your business has shifted to focus almost entirely on drain cleaning. This is something that should be reflected in your business messaging, and that starts with your website content.

4) Your customers are uneducated.

When customers call for a consultation, come in for an appointment, or show up to browse your retail store, they should have at least some idea of what you do. If you find that your customers are often confused about your products or services, or if you find yourself getting the same questions over and over again, it means your site isn’t educating consumers the way it should. It might be time for an update!

5) You’re having your website redesigned.

If you’re giving your website a facelift (and especially if you’re changing the layout or navigation), you’ll probably need to make some adjustments to the copy. Here we’ll note that Grammar Chic’s writers are uniquely experienced in partnering with Web design companies, ensuring you get a seamless final product.

6) You have a high bounce rate.

This is something you can check in your Google Analytics dashboard. Basically, a high bounce rate means people are coming to your site, but then immediately leaving. It suggests that, for whatever reason, the content on your website isn’t meeting their expectations. This could be a matter of poor layout or confusing navigation… but it could also be that your content isn’t as relevant or as helpful as it needs to be.

No matter your reason for wanting crisp new Web content, Grammar Chic is happy to deliver it. We’d love to book you for a no-obligation Web copywriting consultation. Reach out today: 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Content Writing, Web Content

7 Reasons to Hire a Content Writer in 2021

When you run a small business, you know more about it than anyone in the world. But just because you know your business inside and out, that doesn’t necessarily mean you’re the best person to articulate its value proposition… especially not in writing.

That’s where a professional content writer can be invaluable: Translating your knowledge and your passion into messaging that crystallizes what you do and why customers should care.

Indeed, there are a number of reasons why business owners outsource their content writing needs… and, why enlisting a writer may be the best decision you make in the dawning days of 2021.

1) Bad writing will wreck your reputation.

Let’s be honest: Writing is a skill, and not everyone has it. If you’re not a natural-born writer, that’s totally okay! You obviously have plenty of other skills that have allowed you to launch a successful business.

But if you’re not a good writer, that’s something that’s important to acknowledge to yourself. See, if you do your own copywriting but it’s filled with circuitous grammar or sloppy mistakes, it could actually have a counterproductive effect.

For instance, it’s hard to say that your business stands for quality, consistency, or attention to detail if your writing is full of typos.

Hire a professional writer to make sure bad writing never tarnishes your good name.

2) Good writers will know how to connect.

It’s actually possible that you know your business or your industry a little too well.

This is a common issue among business owners, who get so excited talking about what they do that they load their language with jargon, technicalities, or sales-speak.

Sometimes, it takes an outsider to identify what really makes your company special, and to phrase it in a way that it connects with potential customers… not just explaining what you do, but what difference you can make in their lives.

3) Professional writers can help you get results.

Whether you’re writing a blog post, a press release, or an email newsletter, you’re probably not doing it just for kicks and giggles. In theory, your writing should always serve a specific purpose. You should be writing to generate leads, to close sales, to instill trust, or to build your reputation.

This requires more than just a knowledge of how your business works. It also requires knowing how to format your writing, how to build an argument, how to use persuasive language, and how to craft a perfect call to action.

These are tools in the professional writer’s toolbox, and they can ensure that your business writing actually accomplishes something.

4) Good writing is good SEO.

Which is more important: Writing content that appeals to human readers, or writing content that jibes with the Google search algorithms?

Trick question! Actually, by writing relevant and valuable content for your end user, you’ll be much better positioned to occupy prime search engine real estate.

The best writer will have the SEO knowledge it takes to draw the right kind of attention, from your target audience as well as from the search bots.

5) Hiring a writer will save you time.

Honest question: How long would it take you to write a really solid company blog post?

And what else could you do in that same amount of time?

One of the main reasons to outsource anything is to free yourself to focus on the essentials: Leading your team, strategizing for your business, or satisfying your customers.

Allow writers to take content creation off your hands.

6) A professional writer can address a range of content needs.

By forming a relationship with a professional writer, you can ensure you have someone you can call on for a range of needs, including developing new sales copy, composing tweets, and beyond.

As the writer gets to know your business better and better, they will become a trusted marketing partner, able to provide a range of marketing assets for use in your business.

7) Professional writers will work well with your other creative partners.

Believe us when we tell you that a professional writing company, like Grammar Chic, Inc., does a lot of collaborating with other agencies. These might include SEO consultants, web design houses, marketing firms, and beyond.

If you’re looking for a partner who can easily fold into that relationship, ensuring really optimal results across your different marketing activities, consider hiring a professional writer today.

We’d love to speak with you further about all the reasons it makes sense to outsource your writing needs. Reach out to Grammar Chic, Inc. today by calling 803-831-7444 or by visiting www.grammarchic.net.

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Why Content Marketing is Right for This Moment

What comes next?

That’s the question many of us are asking as the pandemic rages on. The year 2020 has been buffeted by disruption and uncertainty, and there’s really no telling what the next few months will bring. Understandably, most of us have our anxieties: Anxieties about our children’s education, about politics, about money, about the businesses we own.

For the most part, we don’t know any more than you do, and won’t venture a guess as to what 2021 has in store. But one thing we can say is that, as you consider your business plans for the coming year, it would be wise to consider making content marketing a part of it.

Content marketing is actually very well-suited for the current cultural moment. Allow us to tell you why.

Why Now’s the Time for Content Marketing

1) Because it’s never been more valuable to connect with your customers.

We know: It’s such a cliché. And you’ve no doubt been inundated with emails beginning with “in these unprecedented times…

But the reality is, we’re all craving some regularity, some sense of connectedness, some inkling that things may return to an approximation of normal. Content marketing can provide you with an excellent way of providing those things for your customers and clients. Maybe you’re looking for an email newsletter to keep clients apprised of new store policies or COVID safety measures. Maybe you need a social media campaign to inform folks that things will be business-as-usual during the holiday shopping center. Whatever your specific communication needs, content marketing can be an asset.

2) Because content marketing breeds trust.

By the time 2021 rolls around, there’s no telling what the economy’s going to look like… but right now, the projections are all showing fairly modest growth. What this means is that consumers and B2B clients are likely going to be more cautious than before about parting ways with their hard-earned-money.

So how can you convince your target audience to spend their dime on your product or service? Old-fashioned, ham-fisted advertising methods are proving themselves to be less and less effective. But earning the trust and goodwill of clients, by showcasing your expertise and thought leadership, can be just the thing. And again, that’s really what content marketing is all about.

3) Because content marketing is highly scalable.

A lot of companies are heading into 2021 with scaled-back marketing budgets. Here again, content marketing may be just what you need. Content marketing is made to scale, and it’s very easy to start with a modest scope and build into something more robust over time. Additionally, content marketing provides plenty of options for tracking and reporting, allowing you to see exactly what’s working and what’s not, then allocating marketing dollars accordingly.

Content marketing can also bring some flexibility to your team. Unable to hire a full-time marketing person? Outsourcing to a content marketing agency like Grammar Chic can be a cost-effective alternative. Or, if you have a marketing team that’s stretched a little thin, Grammar Chic can offer coverage on content creation and distribution, freeing your employees to invest in other forms of value-adding creative or technical work.

The bottom line: If your business is looking for something nimble and elastic, both from a budgetary standpoint and a workforce standpoint, content marketing may be the right way to proceed.

4) Because content marketing can help you build something new.

We understand that a lot of entrepreneurs are going to need to be flexible and creative in order to stay afloat in 2020; this might mean rebranding, launching a new line of products and services, or even creating a side hustle.

If you’re trying something new, you’ll want to promote it. Content marketing provides a great way to generate word-of-mouth buzz in an authentic, organic way. Start creating a community around your new venture via engaging social media content, blog posts, and beyond.

We can help you do it. Grammar Chic, Inc. is always over the moon to work with small business owners, and we’re especially passionate about showing how content marketing can be the perfect thing for this strange season of life.

If you’d like to chat with us about any of this, we welcome you to reach out to Grammar Chic, Inc. today.

Connect with us at www.grammarchic.net or 803-831-7444.

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Communicating in the Time of Coronavirus

What are you even supposed to say to someone in a time of unprecedented challenge, uncertainty, and loss? It’s not a rhetorical question; it’s something all of us have struggled with in recent days, fumbling for the right words, sifting meaningful reassurances from clichés and platitudes.

The reality is that none of our words are quite sufficient for the magnitude of a global pandemic. Nevertheless, they’ve never been more essential. We need words now as much as ever as we seek to convey our empathy, our need, our solidarity, and our hope.

We need meaningful, heartfelt words for the people we love. And, businesses and brands need clear, precise language to let their customers and employees know that they, too, are doing everything they can to foster connection and weather this storm.

No doubt you’ve already been flooded with emails from companies letting you know their COVID-19 policies, changes to normal operat

ion, perhaps even ways you can pitch in and help those who are truly struggling.

And if you are a business owner who hasn’t yet found the right words or the proper tone, there is still time. A simple newsletter, email blast, or Facebook post can go a long way toward letting your audience know you’re with them in this time of crisis.

Now’s the time to speak your heart, and what’s important isn’t eloquence so much as authenticity. With that said, we can offer just a few tips on wise, clear communication in the time of coronavirus.

Communicating Amidst Coronavirus

  • The most important thing is just showing that you care. If ever there was a time to just reach out to your customers and employees, without any underlying agenda, just to tell them you’re around and you’re feeling the confusion, too… well, now is that time.
  • Be proactive in articulating key information. Don’t leave your customers to guess about suspensions of your normal services, or abbreviations to your hours of operation. Keep in contact and let people know how your company is handling the coronavirus. Be proactive in communicating any changes as they arise.
  • Consider some options for sacrificial service. What can your company do to make your clients’ lives just a little easier? Whether it’s free shipping or flexible pricing, every gesture is welcome. Note, these gestures might also make it easier for your customers to support you and your business.
  • Inspire action. Something else you can do with your business communications: Provide links or suggestions for ways your clients can help those in need. Send out information about charities or causes that are making a positive impact during this scary season.
  • Audit your current content calendar. If you have any scheduled blog posts or tweets that might come across as glib or insensitive, now might be the time to pull them and hold them for better days.

And in all seriousness: We truly do believe better days are coming. Until then, the Grammar Chic team sends our encouragement and solidarity to all of you. Hang in there. Stay healthy. Take care of each other. And stay in touch.

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Filed under Business Writing, Social Media

What the Coronavirus Teaches Us About Content Marketing

Kind of an odd headline, huh?  I know—I am well aware that it seemed like a stretch when I started pondering recent current events and their correlation to the topic of content marketing.  On the surface (no pun intended, and I have been wiping everything down with Clorox wipes around here, FYI) it might appear that this pandemic and the content marketing practice have nothing in common. However, as I have tried to digest the seemingly constant and ever evolving stream of information that we all have been inundated with, I started to realize something.  Ultimately, the overall handling of the Coronavirus is essentially a lesson in what not to do when it comes to content marketing.

The Handling of Coronavirus is a How-To Guide for Bad Content Marketing

Below, you will find a couple of themes I have noticed as it relates to the communication strategy (or lack thereof) and the “Corona Crud” as I have taken to calling it:

  1. Have you noticed that there doesn’t seem to be anyone actually in charge of the overall messaging? Have you realized that at any given point in time, varied streams of information (as well as misinformation) come at us faster than we can say “Wash Your Hands!”? Indeed, it’s been dizzying to keep up with and hard to essentially figure out what is true and trustworthy (and if it comes from a reputable source) and what is just plain nonsense.

The Lesson: When it comes to content marketing, having too many proverbial scientists handling the petri dish is a recipe for disaster.  It is necessary to put one person who is knowledgeable, confident, and focused in charge and discourage involvement from other people who want to interject their own messaging or create alternate information streams. There is too much room for error in this regard.

  1. Writing for the sake of writing is bad news. And this has definitely been true with regard to Coronavirus. Hearsay and speculation have run rampant; rumors about miracle treatments, secret labs, and even the CDC’s need for men to shave off their beards to prevent the virus from spreading have abounded. News outlets have worked overtime in producing “click bait” articles that provide little new information but attract the attention of anxious readers eager to learn more. At the end of the day, the agencies in charge have struggled to keep up and have even noted that it’s possible that we are facing an “infodemic.”

 

The Lesson: Producing content for the sake of producing content is a terrible approach. In content marketing, the content that is made public should have a purpose and you have to work to control the spread of information that hurts rather than helps. Admittedly, the WHO and CDC have a big job—they are trying to ensure the public has good information, but they have found themselves unable to control bad content leaking and multiplying from other sources (and some of those sources, frankly speaking, come from the very highest levels of our government).

 

  1. Negative associations can hurt your brand. This isn’t so much about Coronavirus as it is about Corona—the beer. There is a lot in a name. And what’s worse than loose associations centered around a name? Ill-timed marketing campaigns that promise “coming ashore soon” at the exact same moment as when the first cases of Coronavirus started popping up on the U.S. Pacific coast.  Yes, Corona (the beer) actually released a campaign like this—just recently—for its hard seltzer.  The company has tried to reinforce that there is no correlation between their beer and the virus, but bad messaging and misinformation, coupled with consumer fear has the ability to hurt the brand.

The Lesson: Believing that an audience will form logical conclusions without your help, guidance, and reassurance isn’t the best strategy.  If something damaging could be associated with your brand—no matter how far-fetched—work to stop the issue proactively and ensure that your own marketing efforts aren’t being used to reinforce an already ridiculous theory or belief. Again, it’s necessary to remain constantly aware of what is being communicated—no matter if it’s coming from you or another source.

A Good Content Strategy Promotes Real Information

At the end of the day, Coronavirus is a serious situation—and people deserve to trust the information that is being published about this virus. The people and agencies who have microphones, global platforms, and Twitter accounts have a responsibility to share truthful and reliable information. There is a great responsibility placed upon the people in charge of a communication strategy to be transparent and knowledgeable about the content they share.  The conveying of misinformation or messages that negates expert advice is not only a disservice to the public, it is unethical—and this is true no matter what your content strategy is looking to communicate or promote.

At Grammar Chic, we fully subscribe to the idea of creating content that goes viral (no pun intended). However, that content must be based on facts, clear messaging, and benefit the end user. For more information, contact us today by visiting www.grammarchic.net or call 803-831-7444.

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How Can You Optimize Content for Voice Search Queries?

The way people search for online information is fundamentally changing… and that has some seismic implications for content marketing professionals. Arguably the most significant shift of all has been the rise in voice search. These days, it’s as likely as not that a Google or Bing search query will come through a voice assistant (think Siri or Alexa) as opposed to physical typing. Indeed, some studies have speculated that, by the end of this year, more than 50 percent of all search queries will be voice searches.

So how can you ensure that your content shows up in these Siri and Alexa searches? How can you fully optimize to address new search engine user behaviors? Here are a few quick tips from the Grammar Chic team.

How Has Voice Changed the Way People Search?

The first thing to consider is how voice search queries differ from text ones.

Here’s an example. Say you wanted to see some movie showtimes for your favorite Charlotte movie theaters. If you were typing your query into a Google search bar, you’d probably keep it short and sweet: Charlotte movie times, or something similar.

But if you were using a voice search assistant, you’d probably phrase it more like a question, e.g., What are today’s Charlotte movie show times, or what movies are playing in Charlotte?

When developing content, it’s critical to accommodate these long-tail keywords, which can be as simple as writing conversationally; avoiding the “keyword stuffing” practices of the past; avoiding stiff, unnatural-sounding keywords; and, when possible, framing your content in question-and-answer form.

Something else to consider is the reality that many voice search queries are finely-honed and specific in nature. Simply put, most search users don’t ramble on to their voice assistant. They know what kind of information they’re seeking, and phrase their query accordingly. Some examples: Where is the nearest tire store? Or, find a Mexican restaurant near me.

Again, savvy content will address these more specific queries. An FAQ page is invaluable here. We’d also recommend blog posts that are designed to provide authoritative answers to these very particular questions.

Finally, be aware that most voice search queries are localized in nature. If you’re using a voice assistant, it’s likely because you want to find the closest coffee shop, the nearest oil change service, etc., specifically in relation to your current location.

Good content should be localized as much as possible. Include your business name, address, and phone number on each page of your website. Make note of the specific shopping center you’re in or a major intersection that’s nearby. (“Find us at the corner of…,” “we’re conveniently located behind the mall,” etc.) Also include information like your hours of operation, holiday closings, and so on.

Content That’s Made with Voice Search in Mind

The way people search is changing. It’s important for your content creation to adapt accordingly. That’s something the Grammar Chic, Inc. team can help with. Reach out today and set up a content marketing consultation with us. Connect at www.grammarchic.net or by calling 803-831-7444.

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4 Powerful Ways to Reuse Your Blog Content

A good blog post represents a significant investment of your time and resources; and, a major depository of your subject matter expertise. So, what happens when you polish off a post, publish it to your website, and spread the word on social media? Hopefully, you’ll see a big spike in hits, likes, comments, and shares… but eventually, all that activity tends to taper off. That can be a deflating feeling.

But what if there was a way to extend the usefulness of your blog post? To really mine it for all its worth? As it turns out, there are a few ways to get the highest possible ROI from your content investment.

Here are our favorite strategies for truly maximizing the usefulness of each blog post.

Turn it into a “Pillar” Article

A pillar article tends to be a longer, evergreen piece of content that takes a comprehensive look at a particular topic. Once you write a pillar article, the next step is to break it down into individual sub-sections, ensuring that you include plenty of hyperlinks from the pillar to the sub-sections and vice versa. This strategy can enhance the user experience and lead to robust SEO results.

So take a look at some of your most popular blog posts. Could any of them qualify as pillar posts? For instance, maybe you have a lengthy Top 10 list posted to your blog. Consider breaking down each individual point into a smaller post of its own, using the pillar page as a jumping off point for more narrowly focused, supportive posts.

Make a Video

If you have a popular blog post that eventually loses some steam, one way to reinvigorate it is to use the blog as fodder for a video. In other words, once you’ve made a splash on Google, turn your attention to YouTube!

This doesn’t have to be an elaborate video, either. Simply use the blog post as an outline, talking through some key points, perhaps putting together some bulleted slides. It’s a great way to extend the life of a blog post and take your subject matter expertise to a new venue.

Make it into a Guest Post

You’ve shared your insights on your own blog, but there are still plenty of people who remain unreached. But if you know the topic has some juice, you can always write a second edition, ensuring to keep the same points intact but change all the wording, then submit it as a guest post to an industry blog or publication.

Not only does this help you get a little extra mileage from your original post, but it also gives you a way to generate some backlinks to your website, a major SEO win.

Update the Original

Finally, note that many topics will warrant regular updates. If you have popular posts from a year or two back, there may be some merit to reading back through them and seeing if anything’s changed. Are there new developments, trends, or technologies worth mentioning? Some supplemental materials you could include as links? Has your own thinking or perspective evolved in some way? Updating an older post with some new text can sometimes breathe new life into it, and possibly even trigger some new SEO benefits.

Take a Second Look at Your Best Blogs

There are plenty of ways to stretch out the usefulness of a good blog post. And whether you need help brainstorming some content refreshers or drafting a post in the first place, Grammar Chic, Inc. is here to help. Reach out to us when you want to chat: 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Blog Writing, Content Marketing, Social Media, Web Content

6 Content Marketing Metrics to Keep an Eye On

Are your content marketing efforts really working? It’s not a rhetorical question. Content marketing requires a real investment, both of time, money, and brand capital. It’s only appropriate to assess the return on that investment using real, hard metrics.

There are a variety of statistics and numbers you can look at to get a sense of how your content marketing efforts are trending, including metrics available in your email marketing platform, your Google Analytics, and the social media dashboard of your choosing.

Amidst all the possible data and reporting options, here are six metrics we think are especially noteworthy, often quite revealing as to the true merits of your content initiatives.

Email Clickthrough Rates

Start with your email marketing. When you send out your weekly, monthly, or quarterly newsletter, how many of your recipients not only read the content but also click through to your business website? One of the main purposes of email marketing is to encourage more website traffic, and if your emails are actually accomplishing that goal, it’s a pretty clear indicator that your content is doing its job.

Email Subscription Rate

You can also look at the rate at which your website visitors are subscribing to your newsletter. If the subscriber base is steadily growing, it shows that somehow or another you’re enticing them… and that can’t help but involve some strong, persuasive copy.

Dwell Time

Dwell time references the amount of time visitors spend on your website before they head elsewhere. If most people reach your site, stick around for two seconds, then leave, that’s obviously not a great sign. But if your website users can spend a good long while on the site, that means your content game is solid.

New Leads

Content marketing can serve many purposes, but one thing that’s always nice is when your content actually yields new leads. There are a number of ways you can measure this: Email subscriptions, sign-ups for a white paper or other downloadable offer, basically anything that provides you with the name and contact information of an interested customer or client.

Social Shares

This one’s obvious: If your content is getting shared on social media, it means that the content is valuable, and it also means you’re growing your audience size. Note that likes and comments are great, but shares/retweets are especially helpful. Email forwards are also beneficial!

Anecdotal Evidence

For all this talk of hard numbers, we’ll close with something that’s not as easy to measure, but is still worth noting: If you have new clients/customers who actually reference your content (“I saw your latest blog post and it made me interested…”), that may be the best indicator of all that your content marketing is connecting with people

Content That Works

Ready for a content marketing effort that really works, and helps you see those metrics surge? We’d love to chat. Reach out to Grammar Chic, Inc. at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Blog Writing, Business Writing, Content Marketing, Web Content