Tag Archives: Content Writing

Getting Started with Integrated Marketing

There is no shortage of digital marketing tools you can use to build your brand—but which ones are most effective? And how do you use them well? These are the questions that integrated digital marketing concerns itself with. Essentially, integrated marketing is about not putting all your eggs in one basket; rather than spend all your marketing dollars on SEO, an integrated marketing approach might pull together SEO, content marketing, PPC, and more.

The key to integrated marketing is harmony. You want each arm of your marketing endeavor to be working toward the same goal. In other words, your content marketing should complement your SEO, and your SEO should in turn work in tandem with your PPC. Everything should be oriented toward the same goal.

Pulling these disparate digital marketing threads together may seem daunting. For business owners looking to get started with an integrated approach, these general tips and strategies may be useful.

Getting Started with Integrated Digital Marketing

Start by Identifying Your Target Audience

Your integrated marketing approach needs to speak to a particular user demographic—to the people you’re trying to reach, to convert into customers. Before you do anything else, identify that audience. Consider crafting buyer personas to spell out their interests, values, and pain points. Make sure that, throughout your marketing endeavors, you know exactly who you are talking to.

Choose the Right Marketing Channels

An integrated approach does not require you to use every single marketing channel that’s out there; your budget may leave room for just two social networks, for example, so be prudent about picking which two you’ll use. This is where a data-driven approach becomes invaluable; if you have metrics from past marketing campaigns, you can use them to determine which channels get the best results with your target audience.

Know Your Message

What are you trying to accomplish through your integrated marketing strategy? How will you define success? And what message are you going to tell in order to achieve that goal? These are the questions you need to address as you put together marketing content. Ensure that your messaging is consistent across each channel.

Be Cohesive

It’s not just your message that needs to be consistent across all platforms, but also your visual style, the kind of verbiage you use, and more. Think ahead about color schemes, font choices, logos, graphic design decision, and the kinds of buzzwords and phrases you use to promote your brand.

Make Content Creation a Priority

Content feeds all your other marketing endeavors. It provides you with SEO value, with social media fodder, and more. Creating original content—whether landing pages or blogs—should be a central activity in your integrated marketing strategy.

Track Everything

It’s often said that marketing without data is akin to flying blind. Don’t fly blind through your integrated marketing endeavors, but rather set up tracking and analytics for everything. You can really never have too much information.

Review and Revise as Needed

Using the data you collect, determine what’s working and what’s not. Test new ideas, and see how they work. Make tweaks and adjustments as needed, always relying on that information you’ve gathered along the way.

Take a Big Leap Forward with Integrated Marketing

You’re not going to be able to launch an integrated marketing campaign over night, but you can start making your plans and laying your foundation. These tips should help. Start thinking about your goals, your audience, and how you can move your brand forward, using all the digital marketing tools at your disposal.

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Filed under Brand Management, Business Writing, Content Marketing, Social Media

5 Personal Branding Tips for Freelancers

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There are certain agreed-upon resume standards that apply to almost all 9-to-5 jobseekers—but when you’re a freelancer, some of those rules go out the window, and you’re forced to make some critical decisions about how best to present your different skills to potential clients.

The basic principle is the same: You want to develop a strong personal brand, and to posit yourself as someone who can deliver tremendous value and ultimately achieve the desired results. The question is, how do you accomplish that when your career has consisted more of freelance positions than of regular, salaried employment?

The Grammar Chic resume team can provide guidance to any freelancer looking to craft a strong personal brand. We invite you to call us any time. In the meanwhile, here are a few tips to help you with your branding endeavors.

How Freelancers Can Develop Strong Personal Brands

Rethink Your Resume Structure

Generally speaking, we recommend a chronological format for resumes—but when you’re a freelancer, what you want to emphasize is your array of skills. Sometimes, a more thematically-arranged and functional resume, one designed to show what you can do rather than to mark your career progression, might make more sense.

Include a Strong Executive Summary

It’s critical to have a clear summary of your skills and the value you can bring to an employer—something of an elevator pitch for your personal brand. This should be at the top of your resume!

Make Sure You Have a Portfolio

If at all possible, provide potential employers with a way to see your work. An online portfolio can be a tremendous asset, and if you have one, we recommend linking to it on your resume as well as your LinkedIn profile.

Establish Thought Leadership

Prove that you really know your industry well. Start a blog, or at the very least publish content on social media sites, including LinkedIn. Show any potential employer that you are truly committed to your vertical or niche.

Use LinkedIn to Get Recommendations

The biggest obstacle you’ll face as a freelancer is that employers simply aren’t sure whether they can trust you—so give them every reason to feel confident in your abilities. Work hard to accumulate recommendations, especially on LinkedIn. Be persistent in asking all your colleagues and former clients/employers to leave you a glowing notice.

Get Help with Your Personal Branding

All jobseekers need to brand themselves, but it’s especially challenging when you work as a freelancer. Grammar Chic can help you hone your resume and optimize your LinkedIn profile. Contact us today to get started: www.grammarchic.net, or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Blog Writing, Brand Management, Content Marketing, Writing

5 Ways to Be Found by Local Consumers

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For any business to succeed, it needs to be discovered by local customers; it needs to bring in clients and consumers who are actually seeking the products or services in question, and willing to spend their money to get them. In today’s marketing ecosystem, that means a strong presence in local search queries.

After all, when you want to find a good local business, where do you turn for answers? More likely than not, you go to Google—and the businesses you find there are the ones most likely to win your patronage. If you want your business to thrive, then, you’ve got to position it to be embraced by local search engine users—but how?

Local SEO can sometimes be complicated and daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. There are some simple ways you can boost your visibility in local search rankings today.

Get Reviewed

Google reviews are critical to search engine success. Google takes any review to be a sign that people are engaging with your business, and gaining reviews will only help your search engine standings. Of course, it’s helpful if these are good reviews, bolstering your company’s authority and trustworthiness. If you’re not getting regular reviews, we recommend the following steps:

  • Make sure your Google review link is clearly displayed on your website
  • Actively ask your customers to leave you their feedback; include a request on invoices and receipts
  • Send an email to all your best, most loyal customers, and simply explain to them how meaningful a quick review would be
  • Include your Google review link on your email signature

Optimize for Mobile

Most local searches happen on mobile devices, so it’s critical that your website be optimized for users who are on phones or tablets; indeed, Google prioritizes sites with mobile-readiness. Check out your company website on various devices to make sure it looks good and flows smoothly. If it doesn’t, you’ll want to talk to your Web designer about switching to a mobile-friendly site ASAP.

Ensure Consistent NAP

NAP stands for Name, Address, and Phone number, and you need to have this vital contact information displayed on every page of your website. Make sure you state it the exact same way every time, too. Inconsistencies—“Al’s Pancakes” on one page and “Al’s Pancake House” on another, or even listing your address as “Main Street” here but “Main St.” there—can drop your Google ranking.

Get Local Links

Reach out to local directories, business bureaus, and chambers of commerce to get a link to your website—along with NAP information, consistent with the way you list it on your site.

Write Valuable Content

Finally, a website that’s dense with valuable content—not just sales pitches, but information that addresses consumer questions—is going to get more love from Google, for the simple reason that it offers a better product to Google’s customers (i.e. search engine users). A good website with FAQs, how-tos, detailed product descriptions, and a regular blog can go a long way.

Grammar Chic can help with all of these content creation needs, of course. Learn more by reaching out to our team today at www.grammarchic.net or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Business Writing, Content Marketing

Big Changes to Google’s Star Systems (And What They Mean for You)

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Here’s a hypothetical for you: Say you’re looking to purchase a new product of some kind, but you don’t really know much about it, or where to get it. You need to gather some information. You need to do some research. So where do you head? The answer, of course, is Google. That’s where consumers do their research these days—and it’s where they make most of their decisions about which products to buy and which local businesses to visit.

One way in which consumers make their purchasing decisions is to consult with Google’s star system. If you see a local company with a one-star rating, you’d probably think twice before giving them your business, right? You’d at least look around for competitors. And on the flipside, if a business has a five-star Google score, you’d feel a lot more confident shopping there.

The implication for businesses is that Google star ratings matter—they matter for your bottom line. That’s why, when Google makes changes to its star system, small business owners need to sit up and take notice.

What’s Changed with Google’s Star System?

As it happens, Google has made changes to its star rating scale. Here’s the change: It used to be that Google only gave star ratings for businesses with at least five reviews. Now, Google has lowered the threshold—and some businesses are receiving Google ratings on the basis of a single review!

What this means is that, more than ever before, every single online review you get matters. A single one-star review could totally sink your Google score, especially if it’s the only review you have. Meanwhile, a single five-star review could be all it takes to send your company toward a perfect score.

How to Be Proactive About Your Google Reviews

Our advice to business owners: Don’t leave your Google stars to chance. Be proactive in getting your full five-star score! Here are some tips:

  • Make sure your Google review link is clearly displayed on your website and on social media profiles.
  • Actively ask your customers to leave you their feedback. Include a request on invoices and receipts.
  • Go as far as to send an email to all your best, most loyal customers, and simply explain to them how meaningful a quick review would be.
  • Sweeten the deal! Offer a $5 Starbucks gift card or a promo code to people who take the time to leave you a review.
  • Include your Google review link on your email signature.

There are a lot of strategies that can get results, and we’d love to help you execute a good one. Contact Grammar Chic today to learn more! Reach out to our team at www.grammarchic.net or 803-831-7444.

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Filed under Brand Management, Business Writing, Content Marketing, Social Media

5 Ways to Improve Your Website’s Internal Linking

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Internal linking is one of the backbones of search engine optimization. It’s one of the things that separates a mediocre website from a truly stellar one. Providing links that connect the different pages of your website is a small and simple thing you can do that could yield big results.

Internal linking is significant for a number of reasons. One is that it makes it easier for Google search bots to crawl your pace. Another, just as important reason is that it makes it easier for your customers to find the information they want. Internal links keep people on your page, which reduces your bounce rate, and they can also boost the SEO value of the pages you’re linking.

The bottom line? Spending some time on an internal linking strategy is certainly prudent, and can certainly pay off. The question is, what can you do to get internal linking right?

Here are five tricks of the trade.

Link to Content-Heavy Pages

Let’s say you write a 1,000-word blog post. You definitely want to insert a couple of internal links, but you don’t want to waste them on parts of your website that are low on content value—like a generic “Contact Us” page.

Think about it this way: The pages you link to should be resources for your reader, providing them with additional information that enhances their experience. As such, it’s best to link to pages that provide further details or delve into related topics… pages that actually provide enriching, value-adding content, not just boilerplate.

Use Descriptive Anchor Text

The anchor text refers to the actual words on the page that you make into a hyperlink—and choosing the right anchor text can add real value to those links. That’s why you never want to link to bland, boring, or valueless text like click here.

Consider this: You want to provide a link to a recent blog post about the best Instagram strategies. You can make the words blog post into your anchor text, or the words best Instagram strategies. Which of these do you think offers more link value? The more descriptive option is always going to be the better one. Be wise in including good, colorful anchor text with every link.

Include a Couple of Internal Links on Every Page

How many internal links should you feature in each post, or on each page? There’s no hard and fast rule here, and different SEOs will tell you different things, but we’d recommend at least a couple. Remember that each link boosts the “freshness value” of the page you’re linking to, so you might as well take advantage of each opportunity.

Be Logical with Your Links

With that said, we also recommend being wise: You don’t want to appear like you’re spamming your reader, or bombarding your website users with links. Make sure the links you include are relevant. For example, a Grammar Chic blog post about Facebook ads probably shouldn’t link to a separate post about resume writing. That’s just not a logical connection.

Update Your Links Often

Remember that broken links decrease your site usability and its SEO value. Meanwhile, when you write a really good piece of new content, you may want to include links to it from older, relevant posts. Routine link audits and updates are essential.

Of course, linking is an integral part of your broader content marketing strategy—and that’s something the Grammar Chic team can help you put into place. Learn more by calling us today for a free consultation. Reach Grammar Chic’s content marketing team at 803-831-7444, or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Blog Writing, Brand Management, Web Content

Help Your Employees Fall in Love with Content Marketing

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Here’s a little Valentine’s Day challenge for you: do something that makes your team members fall in love with content marketing. Instead of keeping your blog writing and social media posting in a silo, open it up for the entire company to own a stake in. Get the buy-in of key players in your organization, and start benefitting from their ideas, their inspiration, and their encouragement.

An impossible task, you say? Not at all. There are things you can start doing right now to make your content marketing more inclusive, and to bring non-marketing team members into the process.

It All Starts with Education

The first step is ensuring your colleagues and employees all know what content marketing actually is, and why it’s valuable. Have you ever hosted an employee in-service where you go over the content marketing basics? You can do it in a half an hour, probably, perhaps during a lunch meeting some day. Think of a way and a time when you can make the case for content marketing, and ensure everyone at your company has at least a basic idea of why it’s worth their support. Connect it to other departments, too; for example, make sure you explain how content marketing makes life easier for customer service reps, and how it brings in leads for the sales department.

Have a Vision

It’s important for people to know what content marketing is, but also how you want to portray the brand through content marketing. What are your values? What are the aspects of the company you want to emphasize? What are some of the buzzwords you use, the pieces of verbiage you employ when talking about your brand? Share all these things with the team. Provide them with a written reference/guide they can call upon, too.

Ask Team Members to Share Content

Most of the team members in your workplace will have personal Facebook and Twitter accounts—invaluable platforms for sharing the company’s blog posts and status updates. You can’t force them to do this, of course, and shouldn’t try—but it never hurts to ask. Express how meaningful it would be, and you may by surprised by how many employees rise to the challenge.

Seek Input

Once you’ve schooled your co-workers on what content marketing is and why it matters, you’re in a place where you can ask them for their feedback on current content endeavors. What’s working? What changes would they recommend? Take their feedback seriously. Also note that customer service and sales reps, who deal with customers directly, may have some great avenues for new topics—frequently asked questions from customers and leads.

Provide Tools for Collaboration

Finally, make it easy for team members to share images, memes, questions, articles, or anything else they think will be useful for the company’s content marketing endeavors. Something like a Dropbox or Google Drive folder can be just perfect. Simply offering a convenient, hassle-free way to submit content and ideas is a great way of involving others in the process.

The important thing is to open the doors of your content marketing mission; allow other team members to come alongside you. It can only make your efforts sharper, stronger, and more effective. Also, don’t hesitate to bring in the pros from Grammar Chic. Reach out to us at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net for a content marketing consultation.

 

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Filed under Content Marketing, Social Media

Why Your Facebook Ads Aren’t Working

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Over the last few years, Facebook has subtly but significantly shifted its focus toward paid ads. While it remains highly important to distribute valuable content and to seek organic reach, it’s just as vital for businesses to pony up for some paid Facebook ads. Companies that don’t pay to play may not receive as much traction in Facebook news feeds.

The good news is that Facebook’s ad platform is a powerful one, providing both a broad reach and the ability to narrowly target the people who see your ads. The bad news is that it can be hard even to understand Facebook’s ad platform, much less optimize it—especially if you’re relatively new to Facebook advertising.

The Grammar Chic team has ample experience with Facebook’s ad manager. We know what works, but also what doesn’t. If you’ve tried your hand at Facebook ads and not gotten the results you’d like, there are a few potential reasons why.

Poor Targeting

The first potential reason is that you just haven’t honed your audience enough. Though it may seem counterintuitive, it’s actually better to target a very specific audience than a wide one. Simply put: When you target with precision, you increase the likelihood that your ad will truly resonate with the reader.

Buyer personas can come in handy here. Before you start work on a Facebook ad, really think about who you’re trying to reach—basic demographic information, values, pain points, etc.

Poor Headline

Another potential issue? A headline that doesn’t grab the reader. In the age of Facebook, attention spans aren’t what they used to be, and it’s important to choose a heading that really conveys the value of your product or service.

Directness is key. You want something that will register with people who are quickly skimming through Facebook—so avoid the temptation of making your headline too clever. Instead, simply articulate the value you can offer to readers. Say what’s in it for them.

Poor Image Selection

Your Facebook ads should include images; those without images tend to receive much less engagement, sometimes just a fraction of the engagement that a good image will bring. Actually picking the right image can be tricky, and may require some trial and error.

Our advice is to remember that your ad will show up in people’s newsfeeds, and you want it to look like it belongs there. Something casual and organic—a photo of people using your product, for instance—may be a better option than something glossy and staged.

Poor Landing Page

One more note: When people click on your Facebook ad, they should be taken to a specific landing page—not to a generic home page. You want them to land somewhere they’ll receive specific information about the content of your ad, and ultimately where you can convert them into clients.

A good landing page shouldn’t have too much information, but it should clearly state your value proposition—and it should close in a strong call to action.

Make Your Facebook Ads More Effective

Your Facebook ads can have a major effect—and to make that happen, we encourage you to meet with our team. Grammar Chic can help you craft compelling ad copy, write beautiful landing pages, and ultimately get a strong Facebook ad strategy into place.

Contact us to learn more, at 803-831-7444, or www.grammarchic.net.

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Filed under Content Marketing, Social Media