Tag Archives: Facebook Marketing

Facebook is Changing its Algorithms. Here’s How Brands Can Adapt.

social-network-76532_640

In the coming days, Facebook will be making some not-insignificant tweaks to its newsfeed algorithms—prioritizing posts from friends and family members but reducing the visibility of branded posts. In other words, when you sign into your personal Facebook account, the first posts you see will be ones from the people you know and love. Posts from the businesses or public figures you follow will be second-tier.

For the consumer, this is probably welcome news. In fact, Facebook has said the entire impetus for this change is that so many users have complained about being inundated by branded content while missing out on the key updates from their friends and family members. For small business owners, though, this news isn’t welcome. What it means is that branded posts will be less visible on Facebook, and thus, Facebook referral traffic will likely take a dive.

Crafting Posts to Be Shared

So what’s the solution? Given how critical Facebook is to the marketing landscape, it can’t very well be abandoned. The good news is that there’s a way for companies to work around this algorithmic upheaval. Essentially, the way to get branded content into consumer newsfeeds is to have it shared by friends and family members. Engineering this kind of social connection can provide kind of a back door into more and more Facebook feeds.

In other words, we’re back to that timeless Facebook marketing question: What can you do to get your posts shared by as many people as possible? We’ve got a few tips and techniques—some of them tried and true, some a bit off the beaten path, but all Grammar Chic-tested and Facebook-approved.

Keep the narrative brief. Nobody wants to read an entire book just to get to the point of your Facebook post. Aim for text of no more than 80 characters or so, if you can help it.

Select a compelling image. Pictures are what get Facebook shares—period. Colorful, eye-catching images that provoke humor or sentiment are always going to be winners.

Avoid first-person as best you can. Make your post feel like it could come from anyone, to encourage people to share your thoughts. Keep your text to some brief, open-ended questions or short declarations.

Include a call to action where appropriate. Something as simple as “visit our blog for more” can be perfectly compelling.

Share content that’s actionable and advice-oriented. Make sure the blog posts you write and share have headlines that convey immediate, practical value for the reader.

Need some help crafting posts that’ll slide easily into Facebook’s new algorithms? Give Grammar Chic a call. Reach us at 803-831-7444, or www.grammarchic.net.

Leave a comment

Filed under Content Writing, Social Media, Writing

How Did You React to Facebook’s New Emotions?

facebookreactions

It’s a familiar plight: Your friend has posted something candid and revealing on Facebook—maybe something about a sick relative or a tough situation at work. You want to offer your support, to let them know you read their post and are thinking about them—but hitting the like button on such a sobering post seems wrong somehow.

Good news: Facebook has taken a big step toward addressing this dilemma, augmenting its familiar “like” button with a range of new, modulated “reactions.” When you post something on Facebook, now, your friends have the option of expressing their feelings about your post in a number of ways—like, love, anger, sadness, “wow,” and “haha.” (Facebook has not unveiled its long-rumored “dislike” button, which is probably for the best.)

You’ve probably noticed these new reactions already—both on your personal Facebook account and perhaps on your business page. This last point raises an interesting question: How will Facebook’s new reactions change the game for commercial Facebook pages? After years of competing for Facebook likes, will your small business now need to aim for “love” or “wow” reactions? And will it somehow count against your Facebook stats if you get a lot of sad or angry emotions?

What Reactions Mean for Your Facebook Analytics

While these new reactions have already changed the Facebook user experience, they haven’t actually changed the algorithms—at least not yet. Facebook has stated that all reactions are treated equally: When a user reacts to one of your company’s posts—whether with like, love, anger, or “wow”—it means they want to see more of your posts, and the Facebook algorithms will respond accordingly.

In other words, reactions won’t adversely impact organic search results or newsfeed placement—so there’s no reason for companies to fear or prioritize different reactions. Algorithmically speaking, all reactions are good reactions; so long as you’re getting some kind of engagement, that’s what really matters.

New Insight Into Your Users

That’s not to say that reactions aren’t meaningful to marketers. While they may not change algorithms, they do provide new insights into your users—what they think of your content and even your brand.

For example, the more carefully modulated reactions can provide new opportunities for customer service. When someone responds to your post with sadness, that’s a good opening for you to reach out directly and ask how you can provide a better user experience—sort of like the companies that directly respond to complaints on Twitter. By having a more precise reading of what your users are thinking, you can better tailor your response to them.

There are also potential avenues for better targeting—ad campaigns running just to the people who give you “love” or “wow” reactions, for example—though such innovations are still in development.

The bottom line: Facebook reactions are no reason for concern—and in fact, they may be something you’ll grow to love in due time. Keep tabs on who’s responding to your Facebook content—but also how.

Talk with us about your company’s Facebook strategy. Reach out to Grammar Chic at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

Leave a comment

Filed under Content Marketing, Social Media

Facebook is Changing the Rules—Again.

fb_icon_325x325

Small business owners, do you have your Facebook marketing down to a science? Do you routinely post promotional content that generates significant visibility—and website referral traffic? If so, then that’s something to be proud of, but also something to safeguard and protect. And doing so might become a bit harder in 2015: Facebook has announced some significant changes to its algorithms, and—to be completely blunt—they’re probably going to cause your organic reach to plummet.

About the Change

If you want to read Facebook’s full explanation of the algorithmic change, you can check out the full announcement here. The gist of it is this, though: Business pages will see their organic reach take a sharp decline, in particular for posts that are deemed “overly promotional.” In other words, if your posts are pushy and salesy, or if they come across more like ads than actual creative and engaging posts, then beware: They’re not going to appear in nearly as many newsfeeds, and thus they won’t have nearly the same kind of effect.

This may seem like fairly bleak news for business owners, but understand where Facebook is coming from. This move is said to be the direct result of user feedback, and it makes sense that users would want to see fewer ads and fewer brazenly promotional posts in their newsfeeds. Facebook, by turn, is trying to provide the best product possible—and unfortunately, small business owners are the ones who will pay the price for it.

Two Ways to Ensure Engagement

If you’re worried about your Facebook reach being limited, take heart: There are a couple of ways around this problem.

The first, of course, is to throw Facebook a bone. The algorithmic changes in question apply only to organic reach, not to paid promotion. If you’ve got a promotional post and you really want it to be seen, you can just pony up and throw some money behind it, and rest assured that it will be seen in newsfeeds.

The other approach is a bit subtler, but also more sustainable: Start doing some true content marketing. Give the promotional posts a rest and get creative, offering your users some content that’s simply helpful, entertaining, and value-adding. If Facebook doesn’t see the content as overly promotional, you won’t be penalized.

Ultimately, of course, you’re going to need to implement both strategies in tandem. The Grammar Chic, Inc. team can help on both fronts. We offer superlative content creation as well as general social media strategy; we can help you come up with tremendously engaging, non-promotional posts, and also make the best use of your paid post allocation.

To learn more, contact us today: 803-831-7444, or www.grammarchic.net.

Leave a comment

Filed under Content Marketing