Tag Archives: professional writing services

5 Ways to Turn Email Subscribers into Customers

There’s much you can accomplish through email marketing—driving traffic to your website, creating engagement with your blog posts, and simply building brand awareness.

But of course, the ultimate goal is to boost your sales—and with the right strategy, you can turn your email list subscribers into paying customers.

Actually, there are a number of ways to do so. Here are five strategies to consider.

Turning Subscribers into Customers

Abandoned Cart Emails

If you have any experience in ecommerce, you know all about abandoned carts. Sometimes, a customer will like a product enough to throw it into their proverbial buggy, but they end up leaving the page before they complete their transaction—for whatever reason.

With email marketing, you can gently remind these folks to go back and close out their purchase. Your message doesn’t have to be sophisticated. Something on the level of hey, remember this? can work just fine.

Discount and Sale Emails

An obvious one: If you’re running a discount or a sale to help move a particular product, make sure you let your email subscribers know about it. Sometimes, this is all the nudge people need to complete a purchase.

A twist on this strategy: Provide some discounts or coupon codes that are only available to email subscribers, helping the members of your list see the value, and feel like they are part of a special club.

Cross-Sale Emails

Email marketing can also be a good platform to cross-sell or to upsell—basically, encouraging customers who’ve just bought one product or service to consider something related, or auxiliary.

Did someone just buy an electric toothbrush from your store? Send them an email and let them know that you also sell electric toothbrush replacement heads, toothpaste, mouthwash, and other assorted dental products.

Trial Upgrade Emails

Do you offer free trials for your products? This can sometimes be a smart way to get people interested in what you have to offer.

As the trial ends, though, make sure you send an email to let the customer know it—and to encourage that customer to sign on for extended service.

Demo Follow-Up Emails

A similar idea: Say your sales team provides a client with a personal demo of a high-end product. Make sure to send a follow-up email, inviting that person to complete a purchase or to contact you with any lingering questions.

Using Email to Close Sales

When leveraged correctly, your email list can be a powerful tool for generating conversions. We’d love to show you some additional email marketing strategies; reach out to the marketing professionals at Grammar Chic, Inc. to learn more about our services in email strategy, content creation, and more.

Contact Grammar Chic at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Email Writing

8 Ways to Write Headlines that Pack a Punch

Every piece of content you write should have a headline. That headline sets the first impression readers have—and ideally, it helps encourage people to click through or to keep reading.

Indeed, it’s not unreasonable to say that the headline is the most important part of your content. You can write the best 800-word blog post of your life, but if the headline is boring and bland, that post may never get read.

That’s why it’s important to think long and hard about your headline constructions. Today, we’re going to offer eight tried and true trips for making your headlines more impactful.

How to Write Headlines That Get Results

  1. Use numbers. The human brain automatically gravitates toward numbers—so when you have a chance to throw in some specific digits, do so. Examples: 5 Tips for Writing Better Blog Posts; 8 Content Marketing Statistics You MUST See.
  2. Focus on value. What’s in it for your readers? Why should they care about this blog post? Write headlines that let them know they’ll benefit in some way from your content. Example: Hit All Your Sales Goals with These Lead Gen Tips.
  3. Use strong verbs. Whenever possible, skip to be verbs in favor of something more compelling and specific. For example, consider these two variations: 6 Ways to Be a Better Content Marketer 6 Ways to Write Better Content. The second option is simply punchier.
  4. Mention the reader. Play into the egos of your readers; invoke them in the headline, using you and your. This is a proven way to get people’s attention. Example: Discover 6 Ways You Can Inspire Your Team.
  5. Ask a question. If you’re stuck on your headlines, try converting statements into questions. Generate some curiosity. Example: Can Better Headlines Improve Your Blog Conversions?
  6. See what your competition is doing. Spend some time researching the blogs of your competitors or industry peers, and simply make note of how they phrase their Are there any lessons you can learn from them?
  7. Draft a bunch of headlines. Spend a few minutes with an open Word doc, and jot down all the headlines and variations that come to mind. Give yourself a bunch of options to compare and choose from.
  8. Make sure your headline is accurate. Avoid the ol’ bait-and-switch routine. Make sure the headline accurately reflects the content.

Discover Headline Hacks from the Content Marketing Pros

With these tips, you’re well on your way to stronger, more effective headlines. For additional help generating quality headlines—and the content to match—reach out to the writing team at Grammar Chic, Inc. Connect with us at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

Leave a comment

Filed under Blog Writing, Business Writing, Content Marketing, Social Media

How to Write an Effective Facebook Bio for Your Business

First impressions are everything—and while many consumers will first encounter your business through its official website, there are some who will be introduced to your business via its Facebook page. As such, it’s important to treat your company’s Facebook profile almost like a second home page—a succinct but effective summary of the things you do and the value you offer.

But how can you make your Facebook bio resonate? Here are a few tips to keep in mind.

Tips for Optimizing Your Business Facebook Bio

Start with your value proposition. You can’t include everything about your business, and it’s best not to try. Instead, focus on the things that make your company distinctive. What’s your elevator pitch? Or, why would a consumer pick your brand over the competitor’s? Those should be the focus points for your bio.

Be mindful of SEO. While it’s important not to stuff your Facebook bio with keywords, to the point where it reads as stiff and robotic, you do want to include some keywords whenever you can do so naturally. Geographically-specific keywords are especially important.

Don’t forget links. Invite your Facebook visitors to learn more about your company—and make sure to include a link to your home page! Alternatively, create a landing page for your Facebook visitors, a page that thanks them for their visit and invites them to take the next steps in learning about your brand.

Include CTAs, too. All good online content comes with a call to action. Use some compelling verbs to encourage your readers to call, email, or visit your website. Alternatively, simply invite them to like and follow your Facebook page!

Don’t waste space with redundant words. We see a lot of bloated Facebook bios that waste their precious online real estate. For example, telling your visitors that they have reached “the official Facebook home of [Company Name]” is needless. Trim the fat and focus on words that pack a punch.

Drive your benefits. Specifically, focus on language that conveys the value your brand delivers to consumers. Ultimately, your Facebook bio shouldn’t be about you; it should be about your consumers. It should be centered on what’s in it for them to dive into your brand.

Get a Facebook Facelift

Your Facebook bio is an important marketing asset. Make yours count. For help, reach out to Grammar Chic. Our writers are experts in crafting compelling Facebook bios, and we even offer full social media management services.

Set up a social media consultation with Grammar Chic, Inc. Contact us at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

Leave a comment

Filed under Business Writing, Content Marketing, Content Writing, Social Media

6 Things to Ask Your Social Media Manager

While it’s not quite fair to say that everyone has a social media presence, the reality is that most of us do—and that number is only increasing as time goes by. Businesses and public figures can’t afford not to have a footprint on social media, which is where more and more consumers turn for news, recommendations, and connections.

Yet actively managing a social media presence is almost a full-time job in itself. That’s why a lot of small and mid-sized companies now outsource their social media management to a professional—someone who can coordinate postings, respond to comments, generate reports, and ensure strong, consistent brand messaging.

Before hiring a social media manager, though, it’s important to do your due diligence. Here are a few things you should ask to ensure you’re hiring the right person (or team) for the job.

 What to Ask When Hiring a Social Media Management Team

  1. What do you need from me? In theory, you’re hiring a social media management team to take that workload off your plate—yet for your social media presence to feel personal and authentic, you may need to weigh in on some of the content. That’s a tricky balance, and it’s always smart to find out what your social media manager will expect from
  2. How will you evaluate progress? One of the first things your social media manager will ask you is what you hope to achieve—what your goals are from the process. (If your social media team doesn’t ask this, that’s a red flag.) After telling them your goals, turn the tables: Ask how your social media manager will evaluate progress, and what metrics will be used to determine whether or not you’re hitting those goals.
  3. How often will I hear from you? Communication is key, and as you work with your social media manager, it’s good to have a clear idea of how often you’ll touch base, when you should expect reports to be generated, how accessible your manager will be should you have any questions, etc.
  4. What programs do you use for automation, reporting, etc.? A good social media manager will use programs like Hootsuite to ensure that posts are published promptly, and that data is generated consistently. Ask what kinds of programs your social media team will use, and make sure they’re doing what they need to do to make your campaign smooth and efficient.
  5. How will you respond to commenters? What will your social media manager do to answer questions, pass along feedback, or—if necessary—deal with trolls? There’s not necessarily one right answer here, but do make sure your team has a thoughtful plan in place, and that it’s something you feel comfortable with.
  6. What’s your approach to content? A good social media manager will post a good mix of curated and syndicated content—that is, stuff that’s original to your brand, and stuff from outside sources.

Of course, this is your social media presence on the line—so by all means, ask any questions that come to mind. Our team is happy to field all inquiries. Grammar Chic, Inc. provides robust and flexible social media management services, and we invite you to reach out today to set up a consultation. Contact us at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

1 Comment

Filed under Brand Management, Business Writing, Content Marketing, Content Writing, Social Media

Grammar Chic, Inc. Earns Accreditation with the Better Business Bureau

Since 2009, Grammar Chic, Inc. has been a trusted name in written content creation. Our ghostwriters have helped countless small and mid-sized businesses develop a competitive edge through original marketing collateral, while our resume writing team has assisted innumerable jobseekers land exciting new positions. Now, Grammar Chic’s reputation has been made official, thanks to formal accreditation by the Better Business Bureau.

About the BBB

For more than 100 years, the BBB has been an icon of trust in the marketplace. Companies that go through the accreditation are thoroughly vetted and validated as businesses of immense professionalism and honesty. It’s no wonder, then, that more than 70 percent of all consumers say they’d prefer to buy from a BBB-accredited business.

Grammar Chic, Inc. is proud to come out of this rigorous vetting process with the BBB’s seal of legitimacy, and we hope it further inspires trust from our customers and partners.

Our BBB Reviews

What’s more, our accreditation through the BBB means that customers who do business with Grammar Chic, Inc. can now leave us feedback on the BBB website, letting other customers know what their experience was like.

Our team has always sought honest feedback, and we’re thrilled to have another channel to hear from the clients we serve. Grammar Chic, Inc. welcomes reviews on our BBB profile, and as usual, we take very seriously the insights our clients have to offer.

Grammar Chic, Inc.’s Writing Services

With BBB accreditation in tow, Grammar Chic enters a new era of offering writing services to our clients—including:

  • Development of original, SEO-friendly website content.
  • Creation of blog posts, marketing emails, and other marketing collateral.
  • Management of social media accounts, including strategy, content creation, and reporting.
  • Editing and proofreading for business documents of all kinds.
  • Resume and cover letter creation for jobseekers at all levels.

To learn more about our trusted, value-adding writing services—all provided by in-house, salaried, native English-speaking writers—we invite you to contact Grammar Chic, Inc. today. Reach us at www.grammarchic.net or 803-831-7444.

Leave a comment

Filed under Business Writing, Web Content

Brand Storytelling: Where to Start?

Present someone with a list of facts and figures and they’re likely to forget everything you told them; tell someone a story, meanwhile, and it just might linger with them.

That’s the basic concept behind brand storytelling, which is closely interwoven with content marketing. Basically, and very much unlike traditional advertising—which focuses on a laundry list of products or services—brand storytelling allows you to craft a narrative about your company. Who are you? What do you stand for? What are your values? And where does the customer enter the scene?

If that sounds like an ambitious undertaking, it is; your brand storytelling unfolds across many different platforms, from social media to your company’s About page, and it encompasses every piece of content you create plus every interaction you have with our customers.

So where do you get started? What are the opening pages of your brand’s story?

Getting Started with Brand Storytelling

  • Before you publish any content, take the time to write down your actual brand story—how long your company has been around; who it serves; the benefits it offers; the advantages you offer over your competition; and the reasons a customer might choose to do business with you. Keep this brand story handy as a kind of reference, ensuring that all your future content creation aligns with it.
  • Remember that good storytelling usually has some sense of conflict. For your brand, the conflict is this: Your customers have needs, or pain points, and your brand can provide the solution. That’s the central action of all your brand storytelling.
  • Know who you’re telling the story to; awareness of your audience is key. Know who they are and what they care about; what problems they face, and what solutions they are seeking. Creating buyer personas is often helpful here.
  • Also be aware that good storytelling isn’t just about the details you include, but also the details you omit. In particular, you can skip over those details that won’t hold the interest of your audience; keep the focus on them, and the benefits you provide them—not all the finer points of your company history, which may not be as interesting or as relevant to outsiders.
  • Choose the right media to tell your story. Some brands lend themselves very well to Facebook; others, to LinkedIn. Some brands benefit from video, and others really don’t. It’s all just a matter of where your audience is, and which formats make the most sense for the story you’re telling.
  • Along the same lines, always adapt your story to the platform you’re telling it on. For Snapchat, you can be informal; for LinkedIn, it’s usually better to be straight-laced and professional.
  • Good storytelling elicits emotion—and that’s certainly what you should aim for with your content. Always ask yourself how you want your audience to feel about the content you create and the story you’re telling. And, be strategic about how those feelings might prompt action.
  • Use natural language to tell your story. Your vocabulary and your diction should mirror the way your customers actually speak and actually search for information. This is more important than ever, here in the age of Voice Search.
  • Always provide your audience with a clear sense of how the story continues—specifically with a strong call to action in each piece of content.

Time to Start Your Story

Start telling the story of your brand today; allow your customers to see where they fit into it, and how you can help them resolve conflict and find solutions. In short: Tell them a story they won’t soon forget.

Leave a comment

Filed under Brand Management, Business Writing, Content Writing

Should Your Business Write Longer Tweets?

Last November, Twitter doubled its famous 140-character count, meaning that Twitter users now have the luxury of a full 280 characters in each tweet. At the time, it was presumed to be the death knell for the platform, which had long been celebrated for its forced brevity. Most Twitter users acclimated to the new format pretty quickly, however. And, in the months that followed, Grammar Chic has received a number of inquiries from social media clients, wondering if they should be using all of this available space.

To be sure, this isn’t a simple question to answer—and to a large extent, it depends on your brand, your audience, and the nature of your tweets. We don’t recommend writing 280-character tweets just because you can; if your message works best in 140 characters or less, stick with that.

With that said, there are certainly some benefits to the relaxed character count—and some reasons why your business might take advantage of this new spaciousness.

Media Attachments are More Feasible Than Ever

With the old Twitter, it was challenging to compose tweets that included photos, captions, links, and hashtags; simply attaching a photo to your post ate up 40 of those precious 140 characters, right out of the gate. But with the new Twitter, media attachments don’t count toward your character limit, so you’ve got a lot more wiggle room to include visual content and still have room to do some writing and some tagging.

That’s probably the best way to avail yourself of longer tweets; you don’t have to write the Great American Novel, but you can include fully fleshed-out thoughts, attention-grabbing images, and plenty of hashtags and @ mentions to increase your reach.

You’ve Got More Room for Your Messaging

An even more obvious point is that longer tweets mean you’ve got a little bit more room for your marketing messaging. Now, caution is in order: There’s still something to be said for brevity. With that said, it’s nice that marketers can include links to product pages or to new blog posts, along with some brief commentary and hashtags, without having to worry as much about spilling over that character limit.

Again, our advice isn’t necessarily that you should try to fill up each 280-character tweet with text; just use the space you have to ensure a full-bodied thought, along with appropriate tags, links, and media.

Be Strategic in Your Tweets

The debate over long vs. short content is nothing new, and it’s hardly confined to Twitter. By all means, stretch out your business tweets when you feel it’s appropriate, but make sure you’ve got a strategy in place to guide all your content creating decisions. We can help you develop one; reach out to Grammar Chic, Inc. at www.grammarchic.net or 803-831-7444.

Leave a comment

Filed under Business Writing, Content Marketing, Social Media