Tag Archives: Resume Formatting

Why Recruiters Throw Resumes in the Trash

These days, there’s a lot of competition for any given job opening. When you send in your resume, you’re likely one of dozens, maybe even hundreds of people vying for the same gig. Obviously, the recruiter’s got a pretty fully plate—an awful lot of resumes to sift through before setting up interviews.

What this means is that, unfortunately, most recruiters don’t need much reason to throw a resume in the trash can; it makes their job that much easier. So, if there’s anything that’s off about your document, well, a recruiter might very well seize the excuse to make their workload a little bit lighter—which means, alas, that your own prospects are cast aside.

As such, it’s important to know the main reasons why resumes get tossed out before they’re even read. Here are some of the most common culprits. Avoid them—and if you’re not sure how, reach out to the Grammar Chic, Inc. resume writing team.

The Resume is Too Long

Keep in mind what we just said about recruiters and hiring managers having a lot on their plate, and don’t subject them to a resume that rambles on for five or 10 pages. Nobody has time for an epic-length resume, and with very limited exceptions there is no reason for your resume to exceed a couple pages. Keeping it to one is even better, especially if you’re a relatively young jobseeker with less experience to convey.

The Resume is Over-Stylized

Multiple fonts? An array of colors? Tables? Pictures? Broken links? Any of these design elements can be distracting, and cause a recruiter to fear that your resume is more trouble than it’s worth.

Side note: Your resume should be easy to read—and if one look at it overwhelms the recruiter, that may get it tossed aside. White space is your friend, and bullet points are imperative.

There Are No Keywords

A good resume will include some choice keywords, particularly related to core competencies, that help it to register with resume-scanning software programs. If your resume doesn’t pass the software test, it may not be seen by a human reader at all. Keywords are critical.

Your Resume Feels Like Hype

A strong resume will list specific accomplishments and measurable achievements, while a poor one will resort to empty superlatives. If all your resume does is declare you to be the BEST salesperson or a hard-working and driven professional, well, that can seem rather vague—and it can end up getting your resume tossed.

Will Your Resume Get Read?

Even a small tactical error can get your resume disqualified—but the Grammar Chic team knows how to construct resumes that get read, and then get interviews. We’d love to help you out. Reach out at 803-831-7444 or www.grammarchic.net.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Resume Writing, Resumes

4 Formatting Blunders That Can Wreck Your Resume

Keywords-Resume

Writing a decent resume is part art and part science, and there are aspects of it that require real skill. That’s why more and more jobseekers are entrusting their resume writing to trained professionals, like the Grammar Chic team.

Yet there are other aspects of resume writing so basic that the pros aren’t really needed. For instance, formatting mistakes are common, and can wreck an otherwise solid resume—but it’s easy enough to learn these blunders and to avoid them.

And they may not seem like much—but trust us: They buck both aesthetic and resume conventions in such a way that may make you seem unprofessional or amateurish to a recruiter. It is no exaggeration to say that messing up one of these trivial details could cost you your job.

So as you work on your resume—either solo or with a pro—keep these potential errors in mind:

Error #1: Mix-matching your fonts. Some jobseekers use different fonts in different sections of the resume, thinking it adds a dash of style or simply helps them keep their sections separate. Actually, all it does is give the reader a headache. Pick one good, professional font and stick with it. (Grammar Chic favorite: Calibri.)

Error #2: Using inconsistent formatting. This should really go without saying, but when you’re listing employers, job titles, and dates, consistent formatting is essential. Double and triple check your resume to ensure that you’re doing things with uniformity.

Error #3: Overdoing it with bold text. We’re not going to say that you should never use bold font to emphasize certain words on your resume—but you need to make sure you have a very good reason for doing so, and if you see a lot of bold all over your page then you’re probably overdoing it. (In fact, we recommend erring on the side of no bold.)

Error #4: Submitting a page-and-a-half resume. It isn’t possible 100 percent of the time, but we really encourage people to aim for either one full page, or as close to two full pages as possible. A page and a third just looks awkward and incomplete.

These points may all sound basic—and they are. That’s why it looks so bad when you get them wrong—and why it’s simple enough to master them on your own. But for any help or more complex resume writing needs, don’t hesitate to call Grammar Chic at 803-831-7444; or visit us online at www.grammarchic.net.

Leave a comment

Filed under Resume Writing